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By brandonhagen1 on Jan 29th 2011, 8:24 pm Permalink
so i would like to know how many people have tried any of ninkasi's beer.
By haygood on Jan 26th 2011, 11:12 am Permalink
Ward Labs does water testing for homebrewing.
http://wardlab.com/FeeSchedule/WaterAnalysis.aspx

Here's the form
http://wardlab.com/images/SampleForms/wsis.pdf

Either the W5 or W6

W-5
Household Complete Mineral Test
$26.50
Sodium
Calcium
Magnesium
Potassium
Carbonate
Bicarbonate
Chloride
Sulfate Nitrate
Fluoride
Iron
Electrical Conductivity
Est. Total Dissolved Solids
pH
Total Hardness
Total Alkalinity

W-6
Household Mineral Test
$16.50
Sodium
Calcium
Magnesium
Potassium
Carbonate
Bicarbonate
Chloride Sulfate
Nitrate
Electrical Conductivity
Est. Total Dissolved Solids
pH
Total Hardness (Lime)
Total Alkalinity
By Joe24571 on Jan 19th 2011, 6:28 pm Permalink
I come from a background of wine making (more properly known as vinification). I grew up making all sorts of wines with my father...and it was/is a good practice to sample the wine as it progressed throughout all its stages of production.

My questions are this.....

Is it a good practice to sample the wort during the fermentation process?
ie: sample ~ halfway though and perhaps on bottling day?
Would/could this help be an indicator of any "problems"

If sampling is a "good idea", what am I supposed to be looking for?
ie: what should I do if I have a strong cider-y taste & smell 8 days into fermentation...will that linger after bottled and conditioned?

I realize these questions are broad and vague, and can differ from style to style and process to process.....but my gut tells me that I should be tasting/checking it...seeing that I'm VERY new to home brewing...

-Joe-
By mackk on Jan 10th 2011, 8:27 pm Permalink
Been out of the brewing game for over 1.5 years. Came back with a vengeance on Saturday - brewed 25 gal in 6.5 hours.
10 gal. Octoberfest (all-grain)
10 gal. Denny's Cream Swill (partial mash)
5 gal. Alt (extract kit I received for Christmas)
All beer is fermenting happily, and I am quite giddy about my return to brewing! Next up: Denny's RyePA and my house bitter.
By dstebor on Jan 8th 2011, 5:49 am Permalink
Picked up a keg set up yesterday off craigslist. three cornys, gas in beer out lines and a 10lb steel CO2 wiht regulator!!
By Bjossi on Jan 2nd 2011, 12:38 pm Permalink
Just to say Hi as I just registrated to TastyBrew this morning
got 26 ltr IPA in final stages of dry hopping and 25 ltr of dark lager fermeting in my chiller
By JRManHop on Dec 28th 2010, 11:55 pm Permalink
Hey Whats up guys?

I'm interested in making a Blond Ale. Here are the goods. 4# PM, 4.5# Belgian Pils, 1# 20l, .5# Wheat Malt. I'll mash @ 154* mash out @ 166* or so. I'm still tossing around the hop bill, although I do like my beers a little bitter. I've got Willamette, Mt Hoods, Perle, Crystal, Cluster. I'm looking @ about 5%. Yeast will be either US-05 or WL001. Any input would be much appreciated.

By DrGraffnburg on Dec 18th 2010, 4:00 pm Permalink
Primary - Amber Ale
Secondary - Blonde Ale
On Tap - None
In Bottles - Maple Coffee Chocolate Stout
Recently tried and loved - Christmas Ale (Great Lakes), Uber Goober (Shorts)
By jahall92 on Dec 17th 2010, 7:15 pm Permalink
27.6 % 4.00 American Crystal 60L 18.5 43.6
62.1 % 9.00 American Two-row Pale 45.4 2.9
3.4 % 0.50 Vienna 2.0 0.4
3.4 % 0.50 British Roasted Barley 2.0 52.3
3.4 % 0.50 British Chocolate 2.3 43.2
14.50 70.3
By JPow16 on Dec 11th 2010, 3:43 am Permalink
Where can I get my water tested? I get my water from a well and would like to test both the water from the water softener and straight from the well.
By skbhopps on Nov 28th 2010, 12:03 am Permalink
well i just finished a honey lager called untenmann(man down)named acordingly, my daughter named it and i am now brewing a dogfishhead 60 min ipa with some variations by myself
By Dawas on Nov 25th 2010, 4:01 am Permalink
Ever had one of those weekends when you don't know what or how it happened but now your sitting with 5 tanks of various fermenting beers!?!?
By dstebor on Nov 19th 2010, 6:16 pm Permalink
my Mac and Jack's African Amber clone in the secondary for another week before bottling.
By Frizz on Nov 15th 2010, 1:42 am Permalink
I am really nervous right now as I am getting ready to keg a batch of oatmeal stout for the first time. Wish me well!
By mcampo84 on Sep 15th 2010, 8:39 pm Permalink
I'm in the process of starting a microbrewery in my hometown, Staten Island, NY which is famous for loud Italians and a smelly landfill.

To change this perception, I've named my company the Slow Train Brewing Co. in honor of the only commuter rail line on Staten Island, which takes about an hour to travel a total of 20 miles on the local route (express only runs during rush hour, and only towards the SI Ferry in the morning, and away from it at night).

If anyone has any experience starting a microbrewery from scratch, I would really appreciate the advice.

As a side-note, I'm pretty certain I'll be using the Sabco BrewMagic system as my first brewhouse, until demand increases significantly. Haven't purchased it yet, though.
By Rex_Irae on Sep 11th 2010, 7:08 pm Permalink
Lemon with Roasted Barley

I made a sima that's 3 years old now. At the time, I was experimenting adding various ingredients to mead. With this one, I went with pretty much the standard recipe of 2 lemons and 1 oz of raisins per gallon. I believe the honey was at around 13 lbs / 5-gal.
Anyway, way too much lemon for me. It got smoother over time, but it's still like drinking lemonade.
So, I mix it down with something else to make it drinkable.
I was doing that the other night, and it occurred to me that roasted barley would be perfect to set off the lemon. It has a long, crisp finish anyway.
I did some rough calculations, and I think 3 lemons / 5-gal is likely in the right territory for what I'm looking for.
I'm thinking of a braggot with the lightened sima and a schwartzbier.
Trying to figure how much roasted barley it's going to take.
Or a way to do split batches.

Mashing extract

One thing I've been wanting to do for awhile now is a partial mash with extract to see if I can get the extract to break down more in the presence of active enzyme activity.
I got a can of Briess Amber, 3.3 lb.
1 lb of two-row ought to be about right to break it down if it's going to.
In a 3 1/2-gal batch, this would give enough gravity to be in starter territory.
That should give me enough yeast for 5 batches.
By jdt4646 on Sep 8th 2010, 2:56 pm Permalink
I brewed my first all grain batch over the holiday weekend. And this morning when I got up, it had blown beer all over the place. The top of the fermenter was off, with the airlock still in. I'm not sure what happened. Does anybody have any ideas.

Some points to consider: The fermenter was an old 5 gallon water jug (plastic), the airlock and top plug were brand new, but fit firmly. I used a yeast catalyst to get the yeast going. It was a pill that came with the package of yeast.

Any tips or advice would be much appriciated.
By Brewmaster_Cannon on Aug 18th 2010, 1:45 am Permalink
Four more days until my pale ale is done conditioning and ready to drink! I've managed to keep myself from opening one early for the first time since my first home brew. However I'm not sure I'll make it through the last four days or so. One reason I'm very excited for this one is it's a basic highly hopped American style pale ale, but I used British ale yeast instead in attempt to mellow out the hops a bit with the esters. I'm not sure how it'll turn out since it's my first such experiment with such, but I have high hopes for this brew.
By MW66 on Jun 22nd 2010, 5:25 pm Permalink
Sampled my all grain IPA yesterday evening. This was my first batch since not brewing for about 10 years. Finally got a new home and room to brew. I did an all grain IPA, 11 pounds Pale, 2 pounds Vienna, 1 pound Crystal 20L. I did a combination of Chinook, Centennial, and Cascade. DH with Cascade for a week in the keg. TastyBrew stated 88 IBU's. Since it's been so long, I was little out of sorts with my memory and calculations. I started with 6.5 gallons, 90 minute boil, but only ended up with about 3.75 gallons collected wort and a bunch of sludge in the bottom of the kettle. I added cool water to make up the balance to about 5.25 gallons in my 6.5 g carboy. One week in secondary before racking to the keg. I used White Labs California yeast and made a starter. Fermentation started almost immediately. I picked up the carboy after 1 week and noticed that it had a crack and was slowly leaking ever so slightly for the past week. What more could go wrong? Now, 3 weeks later, (1 primary, 2 DH in keg, 3 in carb pressure). Man, this is one of the cleanest, best tasting beers I have ever done! Super clean taste and strong smooth bitterness from the Chinook, no off flavors whatsoever. Boy, how a plan all comes together..ha..ha. Next, I'm going to do a IIPA. However, I'm going to start with 7.5 gallons wort.
By BenAthar on Jun 18th 2010, 7:25 pm Permalink
Well got an email from a person about getting some left over kegs. Needless to say he has a 15 and 13 gal keg left. No matter what the condition is, I am using them to make a mash tun and brew pot with. Since I have another club member that is starting a brewery in the Fayetteville, GA area, I am going to use some of their help in making this work. Beside which I am giving free labor when I can, to learn about brewing on a larger scale in order to eventually get a brew pub started in the same county. While I do have 7 years of restaurant experience in various aspects, including a brewery at Gentle Ben's in Tucson,Az, I do plan on bring some of the southwest out this way. I even know a lot of kitchen spanish and real dishes from Oxaca, Hermisillo, and Jalisco, mexico! Still love the soul food from the south as well. Creole comes to mind.......or shrimp and grits as well!!!
I am just trying to move on up to all grain, and I know that I can do it, but just need these kegs in order to make that an actuality.
I would like to thank the Strawn brothers for their help and insight, as well as the experience to make theirs and mine a reality. Craft brew needs to be brought into the south than people realize, North Carolina can't have all of the fun!