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Subject: Priming sugar question
Author: JCallicoat13
Jul 12th, 2016
12:54 am
I recently purchased two Speidel fermenters, and I'll be bottling my first batch from them over the weekend. They have the spigot built in, so you can bottle directly from the fermenter. In theory, the trub at the bottom of the fermenters is below the level of the spigot, so the trub stays put. I will need to mix in some corn sugar boiled in two cups of water before bottling, though. I'd like to do this the night before, stir it up really well, and let the trub settle back down overnight, then bottle the next morning. The only possible downside I see is that whatever CO2 is produced overnight will go out the air lock rather than being kept in the bottles. Any thoughts on whether that would have any significant effect, if the first 12-hours worth of CO2 is not "bottled?" Or will that be such a small amount that it won't be noticeable in the end?

Thanks in advance!
Subject: Re: Priming sugar question
Author: porch
Jul 12th, 2016
5:58 am
I always rack on top of the sugar. I put the siphon line so that it makes a whirlpool. It stirs itself. Then I immediately start bottling. I've read somewhere that the sugar will settle over time. Bottling over trub seems like such a bad idea to me as well. I strongly suggest racking to a bottling bucket and bottling right after.
Subject: Re: Priming sugar question
Author: Burp
Jul 13th, 2016
12:11 am
Rack to a secondary, allow to settle a few days if you pulled some trub, add the priming sugar solution, stir, then bottle.
Subject: Re: Priming sugar question
Author: Burp
Jul 13th, 2016
1:12 pm
After a restful night sleep another thought entered the pickled brain, priming tablets. Drop a tablet or two into the bottle, add beer, cap and enjoy later. Google beer priming tablet to find forum discussions on this subject.
Subject: Re: Priming sugar question
Author: porch
Jul 14th, 2016
2:53 am
Those tablets are so expensive though.
Subject: Re: Priming sugar question
Author: paulb
Jul 18th, 2016
8:42 am
They're not too expensive but they left a haze in the beer that took a while to settle out.
Subject: Re: Priming sugar question
Author: spargebag
Jul 18th, 2016
3:09 pm
Sugar cubes are cheap and work great. Esp if ur beer is semi carbed. U can rack beer into bottle and lodge a cube into the neck, cap and shake WO an explosion.
Subject: Re: Priming sugar question
Author: Burp
Jul 18th, 2016
10:17 pm
Won't sugar cubes (cane or beet sugar) leave a hint of a cider taste?
Subject: Re: Priming sugar question
Author: spargebag
Jul 19th, 2016
12:06 am
I use 20+% cane sugar in tripels. Not a bit of cideriness. I also prime every batch w cane sugar...no problem. I've tasted batches w over 30% & those were thin and cidery. I see no reason to use corn sugar. Its just more expensive.
Subject: Re: Priming sugar question
Author: Burp
Jul 19th, 2016
12:47 am
I made a beer once using some cane sugar. Pretty sure it was made from parti-gyle brewing. In order to up the gravity I added cane sugar. The beer turned out to have a firm white head, beautiful color and clarity with proper carbonation. The appearance of the beer promised so much and delivered an amazing taste as it slid over the palate. Then WHAM, a gagging reflex. Cider. Guess I added too much sugar. Next time I'll go for a lower ABV.
Subject: Re: Priming sugar question
Author: DConn
Jul 19th, 2016
3:19 pm
There is no evidence that sugar causes a cidery taste. It's from a variety of other things and has been attributed to sugar since it's flavorless and doesn't cover up the other flavors. I've had beers with no sugar at all end up with it.
Subject: Re: Priming sugar question
Author: Longshot
Jul 19th, 2016
7:05 pm
My understanding is that the cider flavor comes from acetaldehyde, which is produced as a by-product of fermentation. In a healthy fermentation it is eventually metabolized by the yeast to the point that it is no longer detectable. I used to get it all the time before I started using proper temperature control and yeast starters (i.e. nearly all of my beers were underpitched and fermented too warm). It's also evident if you bottle carbonate and open a bottle too early.
Subject: Re: Priming sugar question
Author: porch
Jul 22nd, 2016
3:35 am
I've had the cider taste from too warm fermentation. When I add sugar I add it when fermentation slows. I don't know if that does anything but, I saw it on Chop And Brew.
Subject: Re: Priming sugar question
Author: DConn
Jul 22nd, 2016
5:33 pm
Tried adding ot both ways and didn't see any difference.
Subject: Re: Priming sugar question
Author: spargebag
Jul 22nd, 2016
7:35 pm
A friend of mine of Finnish descent makes this nasty crap called kahllia (sp?). Its brown sugar fermented with bread yeast in a sauna. It tastes just like you'd expect...cider notes would actually improve it...
Subject: Re: Priming sugar question
Author: Burp
Jul 22nd, 2016
9:59 pm
Had a lady friend make dandelion wind using bread yeast. Didn't have the heart to tell her what I thought of it.
Subject: Re: Priming sugar question
Author: brewballs
Jul 23rd, 2016
4:31 am
Burp, no matter how hard you try and sweeten them up, a fart is a fart.
Subject: Re: Priming sugar question
Author: Burp
Jul 23rd, 2016
2:17 pm
WINE not wind. Dandelion wine. I thought about giving her a packet of wine yeast but then I would have to explain how bad her wine tasted. She was a nice old lady who passed away a few years back. Maybe she did it as a joke, wouldn't put it pass her.
Subject: Re: Priming sugar question
Author: spargebag
Jul 25th, 2016
12:19 am
I think dandelion wine is godawful by its very nature...redneck Riesling. It is good in beer though. Made a dandelion saison last yr that's tasty and added a few handfuls w the finishing hops in a dubbel this yr...just enough to accentuate the floral notes of the yeast and hops.

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