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Subject: experience with "young" beer
Author: goschman
Jun 20th, 2012
5:08 pm
Ok so lately I have been leaving ales in the primary for 21 days, kegging, then letting cold condition while they carb for 14 days. Usually by this point, there is little change in the beer as time goes on. I am curious as to what others experiences have been when drastically cutting down this timeline.

Last night, I kegged a blonde ale after only 10 days in the primary. The goal is to have this beer carbed in a week. After the sample I tasted last night, it seems like this beer is going to need some time to develop. It tasted watery with a thin mouthfeel and the hop character was strange. I know that patience and time is important for good beer but I am just wondering about experiences when cutting fermentation/aging time in half...
Subject: Re: experience with "young" beer
Author: Dunkelbier
Jun 20th, 2012
5:16 pm
goschman - I generally ferment ales in the primary for 13-15 days. If I keg, I use the shake, rattle and roll method and tap a week after transfering. If I bottle, I give it at least 2 weeks before 'officially' tasting. (I usually sneak one bottle after a week) In my experience, the taste does change quite a bit on some brews, but not so much on others. I've never tried to figure out what beer does what, but I might have to try and put something in my notes about it. Oh, and I don't transfer into a secondary, just in case you were wondering.
Subject: Re: experience with "young" beer
Author: EricHa
Jun 20th, 2012
5:55 pm
The key is, if you're bottling, make damn sure its fully fermented, the last thing you want are bottle bombs. I would move your condidtioning schedule to at least 30 days and 60 if you can be patient enough... you'll like the results better.
Subject: Re: experience with "young" beer
Author: CharlieHorse
Jun 20th, 2012
6:08 pm
As Alton Brown is known for saying, "Your patience will be rewarded."
Subject: Re: experience with "young" beer
Author: brewboy_BB
Jun 20th, 2012
6:16 pm
A young beer is like a young woman. Yeah, they're fun to look at and even play with, but in the end, maturity will make the experience much better.
Subject: Re: experience with "young" beer
Author: EricHa
Jun 20th, 2012
6:24 pm
amen brutha!
Subject: Re: experience with "young" beer
Author: goschman
Jun 20th, 2012
6:34 pm
Ok thanks guys. I will try to hold off on drinking this one for an additional couple weeks so it can condition for a decent amount of time. I kind of thought that rushing it may not be worth it...
Subject: Re: experience with "young" beer
Author: MMMBREW
Jun 20th, 2012
8:11 pm
Goshman: I've had experience with young beer. I think it depends greatly on the style you are brewing. I would suggest force carbing your beer for starters. I purge the co2 out of the beer first, then crank up my psi to 30 or 35, then roll it on its side for about 2 min. Then, I force the co2 out again, and leave my beer in my fridge (The beer will carb much better when cold) at around 20 psi until it is ready. then I put it down to serving pressure. I do this time after time and normally I can drink a fully carbonated beer in 3 or 4 days. It will continue to clear up after that time though, and there is nothing wrong with letting it age either. Cold crashing your yeast before transferring the beer will help get it ready sooner as well.
Subject: Re: experience with "young" beer
Author: goschman
Jun 20th, 2012
8:41 pm
I never think to purge the CO2 from the keg though my friend does it when trying to force carb a beer quickly. What is the purpose of that?
Subject: Re: experience with "young" beer
Author: brewboy_BB
Jun 20th, 2012
8:54 pm
I think he means he's using CO2 to purge the O2 from the keg, which might cause a little oxidation is left during force carbonation. I purge three times on every new keg.
Subject: Re: experience with "young" beer
Author: EricHa
Jun 20th, 2012
9:24 pm
I just purged and I'm ready to purge again....
Subject: Re: experience with "young" beer
Author: Rex_Irae
Jun 21st, 2012
12:49 pm
I usually ferment it for 3 to 5 weeks, or 7 to 9 for the bigger beers or spiced ales.
And I usually like to bottle condition for at least 5 weeks.
That yeast needs time to work its magic.
Subject: Re: experience with "young" beer
Author: MMMBREW
Jun 21st, 2012
6:13 pm
Yes, I purge the keg with co2 to avoid oxidization. Many people put a blanket of co2 into the keg before racking the beer in, but I merely flush it out after I rack the beer into the keg. I have not had any issues doing this.
Subject: Re: experience with "young" beer
Author: goschman
Jun 21st, 2012
6:32 pm
I have not done that to avoid oxidation but I will start now. Luckily I have never had an issue since it seems like a pretty common place practice. I am still pretty new to kegging.

Anyone have any input on to what types of beers may not need as much conditioning/aging? I would assume beers with simple grain bills need less time to mature since there are not as many ingredients. Again, just out of curiosity...
Subject: Re: experience with "young" beer
Author: brewboy_BB
Jun 21st, 2012
6:39 pm
IPA, PA and wheat beers are generally good when they are young.
Subject: Re: experience with "young" beer
Author: EricHa
Jun 21st, 2012
9:12 pm
stouts too. My general rule has been if its over 6.5% it needs to age for at least 3 months. but style has alot to do with it too.
Subject: Re: experience with "young" beer
Author: goschman
Jun 21st, 2012
9:49 pm
Yeah we are still drinking an IPA that is at 7.8% and has been in the keg for about 2 months. It has gotten much better but still has that alcoholic bite that I think will subside with time.
Subject: Re: experience with "young" beer
Author: EricHa
Jun 21st, 2012
9:53 pm
I don't think you should be getting an alcoholic bite at only 7.8%... you're taste perception could be totally different from mine though... I would go back to your fermentation temps and keep them much lower next time.
Subject: Re: experience with "young" beer
Author: Gort_Brew
Jun 21st, 2012
9:54 pm
The timeline for pro brewing is way shorter... primary fermentation usually last 3-5 days and you'll "cap" it at the end. Once it's been capped for 24 hours you can then chill it. You'll wanna chill it for at least 5-7 days (if you want clear beer then it will take longer... but you can filter or use finings at this point). Now you can carbonate.
Subject: Re: experience with "young" beer
Author: Gort_Brew
Jun 21st, 2012
9:54 pm
Obviously most of us can't cap our beer at home but this should give a good idea.
Subject: Re: experience with "young" beer
Author: Gort_Brew
Jun 21st, 2012
9:56 pm
Turn around for an average ale is usually between 2-3 weeks. There a few key factors to this but the main ones are oxygenating your wort properly and temperature control.
Subject: Re: experience with "young" beer
Author: goschman
Jun 21st, 2012
10:04 pm
Thanks Eric...I thought it was strange to have the alcoholic bite at only 7.8 as well but I don't know what else it could be other than it being very dry for an IPA. That one fermented with US05 at 62 for three weeks and finished with about 89% apparent attenuation. It is very strange because it has almost an warming alcoholic sweetness to it but the numbers don't back it up. It could definitely be something with my pallate...
Subject: Re: experience with "young" beer
Author: EricHa
Jun 21st, 2012
10:42 pm
go look at the flavor wheel while you're drinking it, it could actually be something else you're tasting but the only thing you can think of is 'alcoholic'...

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