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Subject: Cooking Pot
Author: Lost_in_my_Lager86
Jun 15th, 2012
4:31 am
what would the best kind of pot be to cook up my wort with? will any 20qt stockpot do? i finally got my kit today only spent $118 on it... it came with a bock extract/steep kit... i don't fully understand about measuring the gravity of the beer.... someone please elaborate
Subject: Re: Cooking Pot
Author: Langeneckert
Jun 15th, 2012
4:51 am
First, a bock should not be the first beer you make. Lagers are challenging for seasoned brewers, and yes, a bock is a type of lager. Put that kit aside and save it for your 10th brew. The ingredients wont go bad... maybe buy new hops if you dont keep them in the fridge. I would suggest trying something like a pale ale or a blonde ale for your first beer. Both of these are pretty simple, hard to mess up. Lagers require fermentation at about 40F. Ales, like the pale ale or blonde ale, can ferment out at room temp... about 68F. Lagers take about 6 weeks to ferment out. Ales take about 2 weeks. Ales are easier all around.

Since you are using extract you only need to bring the malt extract and water up to a boil, then add the hops according to the instructions in your kit. Aluminum or stainless steel are the best pots to use.

As far as gravity goes, its a measure of how much sugar is in your beer. This will allow you to calculate the alcohol in your beer because yeast eat sugar and excrete CO2 and ethanol in almost a 1:1:1 ratio (sugar:CO2:ethanol). With a kit we know exactly how much sugar you are adding, but we do not know the volume, so we cannot calculate concentration of sugar. There should be a hydrometer in your kit. The hydrometer floats in the wort. It is most accurate at 63F. The more sugar in the wort, the higher the hydrometer floats in the wort. The simplest calculation you can do in your home to figure out the alcohol content is to measure the gravity of the wort after brewing and then measure it again when you are bottling your beer. Subtract the starting gravity from the final gravity and divide that number by 2.

The best advice I can give you is to clean everything. Soap is not good enough. Using your dirty old dish rag is not cleaning things. Your local homebrew store probably sells all sorts of cleaners, Iodine, PWB. These work well. It will save you alot of heart ache to clean everything very well. You have to think on a microscopic level, one tiny microbe can turn your best beer into something that smells like sewage. Be paranoid. Pay attention to detail.

Good luck in all your homebrew endeavors.

Cheers!


Subject: Re: Cooking Pot
Author: MMMBREW
Jun 15th, 2012
6:35 pm
Most kits are ale kits. I'm guessing his kit comes with ale yeast as well. A bock is traditionally a lager yes, but he could certainly do an ale version and make a good one too. My lhbs sells a bock ale kit, I beleive it come with white labs german ale/ kolsch yeast.

Lost: there are many ways to take a gravity reading but a hydrometer is a pretty simple device to use. Follow Langeneckert's directions and you'll be good. There is a free copy of John Palmer's "How to Brew" online, but I'd suggest getting yourself a copy as well. Its a great book and is simple to use.

Subject: Re: Cooking Pot
Author: Lost_in_my_Lager86
Jun 15th, 2012
9:45 pm
the guy at the homebrew store said that their kits were like ale style as far as making them... nothing like a difficult lager... even though lagers are my favorite... the beginning gravity for this kit is 1.050-1.052 and the final gravity is 1.010-1.012 he was tellin me thats how u check if ur beer is done too... the kit i bought also comes with sanitizers and believe me i know not to used a old dish rag
Subject: Re: Cooking Pot
Author: MMMBREW
Jun 15th, 2012
9:54 pm
Yeah you're good man, do as much reading as you can, and feel free to ask questions on this forum. You'll normally get great advice. Do you have grains to steep with your kit? I made beer that way for a year and made some great stuff. Some of my better beers were extract with steeped grains. The bock ale will be tasty!

btw: you're beer is done when there is no activity from the yeast. You can gage this by taking a few hydrometer readings a few days apart once your airlock is done bubbling. I normally give my beers at least 3 weeks before I do anything with them. And I always take readings at the beginning and end.

Subject: Re: Cooking Pot
Author: redbrew
Jun 15th, 2012
10:17 pm
Welcome to home brewing Lost. Keep it clean, watch your fermentation temps and most of all be patient and you will be good to go.
+1 for "How to Brew" by Palmer. A must have IMHO.

Lots of good guys and info here. Ask away.
Subject: Re: Cooking Pot
Author: Lost_in_my_Lager86
Jun 16th, 2012
12:54 am
yeah the kit did come with some grains to steep... i tasted them just how they were and i think this beer is gonna taste great when i get done with it... the only thing is i want soo bad to brew now but i'm in the process of moving to the mtns of NC... i think whenever i do finally brew it i'll probably put some posts up to make sure i'm doing it right... i can't wait though its frickin killing me

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