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Subject: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Jan 20th, 2011
2:24 am
Are there Homebrewers in this forum who are similarly situated like me? I am a Filipino, living in Southern Philippines (Iligan City). I'm addicted to this hobby for almost a year now and I have brewed 14 batches already together with my brother. This thread is intended to be an eye opener to everybody on my situation here.

I envy you guys in the USA, because you have all the equipment and raw materials needed for our hobby. Creativity would always follow when it is needed. What I mean is that I did a lot of stuff that you would not normally or usually do like malting at home, propagating/maintaining yeast in a mini lab.

There's nobody out here to help me. So maybe friendly people from the Good USA could give me some advice on DIYs and where to buy cheaper stuffs. I usually purchase online from Midwest, consolidate my orders in my auntie's house in San Diego, then ship it thru a balikbayan box to Manila, then transship it to Iligan City.

I'll post some needed stuff soon. Thanks guys
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: nander21
Jan 20th, 2011
3:58 am
hay fil its cool to hear from a homebrewer from so far away, and it sounds like a real hassle to get your supplies. there's got to be a bettor way to get grain and hops, are there any local brewers that imports supplies that you can talk to?

I live in the southern US and keeping fermentation under control in the heat can be a hassle and there are a few DIY tricks to combat the heat. so is that the kind of stuff you need help with?

also im interested to hear if there are any traditional Filipino beer or beer like drinks that i could whip up a batch of, and ill give you some recipes of my own. I think that would be cool.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: WAbrewer
Jan 20th, 2011
8:30 am
San miguel great filipino beer. .. and welcome fil.. my wife. Is from Tarloc in the north. .. we have talked about moving there and have been wondring how complicated it would be to brew there. .... I am not sure of any way to make it cheaper unless you were to find a local brewer or maybe even san miguel in. Manilla to buy grains and yeast from them... may be a profitable business start up
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Jan 20th, 2011
10:59 am
Thanks nander21. I have done malting at home with pretty good results, the only downside is that i cannot be sure if the grain is infected with fusarium which makes the beer gushing out of the bottle as soon as you open it. To be honest, I have most of the equipment you guys have, keezer, magnetic stir plate, slants, petri dishes, all grain setup and a kegging system for 4 kegs but there are a lot of new stuffs that i would like to have that are not immediately available here.

With regards to Filipino beer, we have a naturally fermented drink called tuba. Its from the nectar sap of the coconut tree that ferments spontaneously. I would like to experiment on it soon with brewing but the most interesting part is its natural yeast which contains the same genus of yeast that we use in brewing (Saccharomyces Cereviseae) and other fungus and bacteria including acetobacter, which turns the tuba into vinegar 3 days after it is being harvested.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Jan 20th, 2011
11:27 am
Hey WABrewer, its quite challenging to brew here in the Philippines. but there was once a Canadian who had a blog on the net. Check out Homebrewing in the Philippines by Dan Carol. He hurdled a lot of the difficulties of brewing here. Have not heard of him since 2008 though. If ever you decide to move to the Philippines, here's some tip. Bring with you the orange rubber carboy cover, it fits well with the most readily available fermenting vessel here. Drinking waters in the Phils use the carboy looking plastic containers.

San Miguel is good but drinking the same beer for 15years makes you think to make your own beer and beat them. Seriously, barley is available anywhere in the Phils but only for animal feedstock. 95% of world barley production is for animal feed and 5% goes to food and beverage. Any locality in the Phils has a feedshop, remember we are a country where 50% of the males are crazy over cockfighting, so you can buy it from there around $.60/kilo, then you have to malt it. I'm lucky to have a big dryer (food dehydrator) that can process 50kilos at a time, make them into pale malts, vienna, munich, biscuit and some roasted malts. Hops is not really a problem because it is light, compact and handy. Every filipino has a relative in the US and i ask my relatives to bring hops for me just enough for a 1 year supply and store them in the freezer.

I guess homebrewing in the Philippines would come out cheap if we have a co-operative type of association where we can consolidate our orders from different suppliers locally or abroad. Contact me when you decide to stay here. Thanks
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: redbrew
Jan 20th, 2011
4:03 pm
Hello Filbrewer
Good to see you on the forum. If you can get your hand on some rhizomes then you should be able to grow your own hops easily enough. The climate there being wet and hot shouldnt be a problem. I am going to try to get some growing on my property in Cavite. There is a guy in the Greenbelt 3 area of Makati that has a small brewpub in the Glorietta mall. He had a regular lager and dark lager and a heifeweizen on tap. I would get in touch with him and see if he can help you with the malt and yeast.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: troybinso
Jan 20th, 2011
4:32 pm
There is a pretty big homebrewing scene in Australia. I would think you could get equipment and ingredients shipped from there for a decent price, although it sounds like you have the equipment end of it pretty well covered. I guess I would stick with dry yeast, since liquid yeast probably wouldn't last a long trip over the ocean. Home-malted barley sounds like fun, but I would think you would have a problem with a consistent extract. Get yourself a couple of sacks of 2-row or pilsner and save your home malting for experiments in crystal and toasted/roasted malts.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: EricHa
Jan 20th, 2011
5:34 pm
Yea, I was thinking same thing, there are supply shops in AUS, would at least be faster...
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: jmario666
Jan 27th, 2011
5:21 am
Hello Filbrewer,

I'm in a similar situation. I came from the US about 8 months ago to live here (Metro Manila/Cavite) permanently and brought my brewing equipment with me. I had never done an All-grain batch before, just partial mashes; so it will be quite an experiment when I start my first Filipino brew in a few weeks. I'm planning on making a lauter tun either from a cooler or by insulating my bottling bucket. Then comes a wort chiller that I'll either have to figure out how to solder the joints on copper tubing or just order one from the States.
But for ingredients, I don't believe there are any local suppliers of hops or yeasts. I plan to harvest yeast (after getting dried yeasts from the States) and keep them in the freezer under 25-50% glycerol (which I think is available from Mercury Drug). So hops will be the only item that I will need to import on a continuing basis. But I plan to order some hop rhizomes from the States and hope that they take to the tropics well.
Australia is closer than the States, but their prices on hops is as much or more that US prices - and I haven't asked them for a quote on shipping yet.
I still haven't been able to find barley in the animal feed stores in Cavite province. They have no idea what barley is. Is there a Tagalog word for it? Are there any feed store names that I should look for? Also, have you been able to find a local supplier of bottle caps? San Miguel produces them from a separate business unit, but I don't know if they will entertain orders of 500 pieces or less. At least you speak the language, so you can negotiate better. I guess if you're kegging, you don't need caps anyway. Where did you get your kegs?
Other than that, I think I have all my needs covered.
What other tips or equipment do you need help on? I didn't realize how easy I had it as a home brewer in the States. Even finding the materials to make a wort chiller is fairly daunting here. I could just drive a few miles to the homebrew store or The Home Depot before. I'd be willing to share any help I can give you, but if you already have over a dozen batches under your belt, you are way ahead of me. I'll have to try to watch out for the Fusarium as well. Thanks for the information.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Jan 27th, 2011
2:30 pm
Hi jmario666,

I'm glad to hear there's another beer enthusiast here in the PI. I haven't used a wort chiller before. My technique is to dip the whole brew kettle in a beer cooler (they come in rectangular form) filled with crushed ice and small amount of water. I could bring the temp down to 20c in less than 15mins by continuously stirring the chilling wort. I assume that using copper tubes as wort chiller with water from the faucet is not enough. Water temps in the PI from the faucet is about 28-30c. I'm lucky enough to be situated near an ice plant where they sell crushed ice, half a block for only PhP50 ($1).

For the MLT, I bought a 10gal picnic cooler (Rubbermaid) and improvised the false bottom from scrap perforated stainless steel sheets. I changed the spigot with a plastic ball lock type. The insulation is quite OK, just temper the picnic cooler MLT with boiling water before you're about to start in order to avoid temp drop during rests.

I wonder why you cannot find barley in Cavite, it's simply called "barley" here. There's no Tagalog word for it. Maybe you should go to a bigger feedshop (Agrivet store) such as Pacifica Agrivet. Barley is used as a conditioning feed for the roosters to loosen up weight before a cockfighting tournament. I guess you are annoyed by your neighbor's roosters early morning cock-a-doodle-doo, so better ask them where to find it.

I'd better consolidate orders from the US on a regular basis especially hops. I'm not sure if they'll grow here. Update me on your experiment, though. IMO, hop pellets are very handy and light. Tell your friends or relatives to send you tons of it when they come over. Hand carrying them is not a problem, unless ignorant authorities here might think of it as marijuana. Hahah! Also, include your favorite yeasts in your orders. I would suggest to get those Wyeast smackpacks activator or propagators. Here's the big deal, to be sustainable in brewing in the tropics, you need to learn how to maintain and propagate them. Check out the article of MB Raines in http://www.maltosefalcons.com/tech/yeast-propagation-and-maintenance-principles-and-practices. Get to know the local laboratory supply shop and invest on some equipment. Or better yet, Go to the chinatown area of Manila to purchase those items mentioned by MB Raines.

I bought my caps from a sales agent on packaging of san miguel. They really don't sell in small quantities. Minimum is 1box at 10,800pcs/box for PhP5,000. It's a long story how I convinced them to ship 1 box to Iligan City and paid them online and the same story goes of how I got my free sample of clarifying agents (Irish Moss, carrageenan from Shemberg marketing) from Cebu.

Currently, I try to stretch my batch size to 7-8gals. I keg the 5, and bottle the remainder. Got the kegs from the US. Maybe it would be better to communicate with you through skype, my username is peppoppep

Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: BobbyD
Jan 27th, 2011
4:50 pm
There is a Homebrew supply in Honolulu.

http://www.homebrewinparadise.com/

But being in Honolulu the prices might be kinda high. It would be worth a look, the owner is a nice guy.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: EricHa
Jan 27th, 2011
10:12 pm
Hops will grow between the 35th and 55th parallels regardless of north or south. I'm not exactly sure where the philipines lie but that should be your starting point and I would think that AUS or NZ would be the best place for info/supplies...
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Jan 28th, 2011
2:04 am
The Phils is between the 5th and 20th parallels north. Hops is not really a problem. I prefer to get it from the US because I have relatives there coming in and out every now and then.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: jmario666
Jan 31st, 2011
7:38 am
Thanks Filbrewer,

Thanks to your tip about Pacific Agrivet, I scored 5 kg of barley to play with until the yeast and hops arrive. They have several stores in Cavite and Laguna, and a store in Silang, Cavite is not too far from my workplace. I thought the wort chiller would help out a lot, since it always took me about 30 minutes to cool down my pot with only a partial mash (3 gallons). So now with >5 gallons, I'll have to have a lot of ice ready to use. I was planning on using a prechiller with the wort chiller, since the water temperature probably isn't much lower than 25 deg C here, even in the cool months.
Yeah, hops isn't supposed to grow very well here, but it is worth a shot. There are reports of someone in India growing hops at 19N parallel, but I don't think they mentioned altitude. Supposedly the hop plants need 18 hrs of sun to flower, so that is why people have trouble in the tropics - it's not the temperatures, it is the relatively even distribution of day and night. So if they do take root, I can hook up a grow light for 6 hrs a day and get the hops to flower. Then maybe give them a break for a month or two, and turn on the grow lights again. The hop flowers are reportedly smaller, but similar in taste/bitterness. I just wouldn't be able to measure the alpha acidity of it, etc. But still could be fun and help out with sustainability.
I guess the Wyeast smackpacks are fine to ship with relatives, huh? Since they will only be out of the refrigerator for a few days it is not a problem. I was leaning away from liquid yeast, but I will have to order some of those, Wyeast is my favorite.
The link to MaltoseFalcons was very informative, and I will make some good use of their tips and techniques. Since I've worked in microbiology labs, I'm pretty confident that I can preserve relatively pure cultures of the yeast and build up a good yeast bank. Thanks also for the tips on the caps and carageenan.
I don't use Skype very much to chat, just occasionally for video chat with the relatives. But if I change my mind, I will look you up. Shame that Dan Carol is not around anymore and his Homebrewers of the Philippines group lost steam.

Prost!
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: WAbrewer
Feb 11th, 2011
11:07 pm
I found a homebrew store located in Singapore Might be a bit more affordable and easier from there... give them a look

http://www.ibrew.com.sg/Malt.asp
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: jmario666
Mar 2nd, 2011
3:08 am
Hey Filbrewer,

I hope that you still check this board. I was wondering where you buy your CO2 for kegging. I'm investigating carbonation options, and there is a welding shop just down the street. But all the U.S. homebrew websites insist that the CO2 must be food-grade. So where can you fill up on the good stuff, or do you just go to a welding shop?

Also, were you able to find a smaller CO2 cylinder here in the Philippines? Those big tanks they sell or rent at welding shops would last me a couple of years, I think. It looks like some Mercury Drug stores have oxygen tanks that can be purchased, but I haven't inquired about the capacity, price, or filling options (or if CO2 will work with them - maybe the regulators are too low pressure?). Also, there are SodaStream CO2 tanks available at some of the finer food stores, but you have to get a connector to attach a normal regulator to it (masyadong mahal at $50 US or more), plus, I'm sure they are charging the maximum price for refilling those tiny tanks. Refilling at the places with SodaStream would definitely be a viable option, though.

Cheers,
Mario
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: MMMBREW
Mar 2nd, 2011
4:18 am
Filbrewer: just wanted to say that you're an inspiration man! You're obviously dedicated to the hobby/craze of homebrewing. Not many people would go through all the work and trouble that you have. I'm sure its frustrating sometimes, but you have obviously learned well beyond what normal homebrewers here in america have learned so far. You can malt/kiln your own grain and have some good yeast knowledge as well. (obviously.) What types of beers do you brew? What types do you enjoy drinking?
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Mar 8th, 2011
1:25 pm
Hi Guys,

Sorry, I was off for almost 2 weeks, I was very busy for my wedding last March 5th. So, the guests were pleased with my latest brew of American IPA, Oatmeal Stout and Pineapple Wheat (a flop, too much cider flavor) and a Calamansi Soda (Philippine Lemon),, all served in my keezer from a corny keg to the cobra picnic tap. I'm waiting for my next US orders that includes a beer tower tap so I don't have to open the Freezer lid and pull out the picnic tap everytime i want to drink beer.

jmario666: I bought my co2 tank (5lb) from the US with four corny kegs and 4way manifold. Just like your problem, I could not find any gas company here who could reload my co2 tank. I heard the SIG company in manila does reload your co2 tank but i'm doubtful if they entertain small concerns. Here are your easiest chances; San Miguel Brewery, Asia Brewery, Pepsi Cola, and Coca Cola. These four are the biggest users of food grade co2. Every Establishment you go, Jollibee, McDonalds, Pizza Hut etc... they dispense sodas through co2, therefore, they have the supply. What I did was to ask my friend a favor who has a small establishment selling pepsi cola products by asking the sales agent from Pepsi Cola if he could reload my co2 tank. The sales agent was kind enough but the downside is that he cannot accept the brand new co2 tank i bought from the USA because they are not sure of the fittings or maybe he could be questioned using unauthorized co2 tank. So I agreed but I paid PhP800 for the deposit of their (pepsi) tank plus 200 per reload. That's a 20lb tank jmario666, it was not clear if the tank is now mine since I paid a deposit of P800 but it's cheap...only 200 per reload.....and please don't be tempted to use those welding tanks, they're not safe. Again, make friends with those establishments who sell sodas dispensed in CO2 tanks, it's the only way to go.

MMMBREW: Thanks for your appreciation man. Yeah, sometimes it's frustrating especially if there's not much of a community here to share this hobby/addiction. People here are only familiar with Pilsners and Strong Lager (Red Horse). Beer is slowly declining in sales here in the Phils with the introduction into market of Crazy stuffs Tanduay Ice and Gilbeys Premium Strong....These are mixed spirits with fruit juice or tea, carbonated and sold on clear beer bottles. It tastes Sweet and costs very cheap. MMMBREW, I have brewed Oatmeal Stout, Imperial stout. American IPA, Belgian Wit, Golden Strong Ale (flop), Dark Pumpkin Ale, Fuhrer Smoked Ale and Blue Ginger Ale. I also wanted to try some fruity brews for the ladies to enjoy, those things that have delicate falvors and aroma. I have not yet tried a lager, though my Oktoberfest yeast and Czech pils yeast in WYEAST propagators are still in the fridge. I Have to inocculate and propagate them since they are almost six months since they arrived. I enjoy most of the belgian styles; Chimay blue, Duvel, rochefort, the lambics, hoegaarden forbidden fruit and wit, saison as well as Long Hammer IPA. For session I love hefeweizen and sam adams boston lager. Do you suggest any recipes? I still have Rauchmalz, Pale malt, Carapils, Biscuit, Chocolate malt, coffee malt, cara wheat, pale wheat, biscuit oats, Hallertau, simcoe saaz and cascade. It's still a long way man, I still haven't touched on the british beers. I'll post another board soon.

Thanks guys.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: brewboy_BB
Mar 8th, 2011
1:39 pm
"and please don't be tempted to use those welding tanks, they're not safe."

Huh??? That's all I use and I have 2 of them.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Mar 8th, 2011
1:49 pm
brewbiy BB: really? sorry, I think the tanks will be alright if you could vouch for it but the co2 must be food grade, The co2 we have readily available here are the ones used for air guns, they are sometimes greasy.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: BryansBrew
Mar 8th, 2011
2:30 pm
Same with BB- I've been using CO2 from a welding supplier for many years. The same company also provides beer gas mix, so I doubt they're using different CO2 sources.

I've only seen CO2 with grease in cartridge form. Usually (like with an air compressor) the oil is added in-line, not within the tank. It may be different elsewhere, but in the states (at least in my area) no one's had an issue. (Same goes for O2).
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Mar 9th, 2011
12:14 am
Very well! It may be okay to use those tanks but jamrio666 must find a co2 source to fill it up. Again, Pepsi don't accept filling co2 tanks other than their own (in the Phils). It's a great bonus anyway, PhP800 for tank deposit and P200/ reload of 20lb tank...just secure your own regulator.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: jmario666
Mar 11th, 2011
11:32 am
Hey Filbrewer,

Congrats on your wedding! That's awesome that you served up your homebrew. I've never been able to keep enough on hand to share with more than a handful of people. But you have been busy making many batches in the last year.

Thanks for the tip on Pepsi/Coke vendors. A friend serves San Miguel draft in his restaurant, so that is the first person I will ask about it. Maybe his contact will be able to score me some corny kegs (wishful thinking). P800 deposit and P200 a fill, that's a bargain for CO2. I think the rental on a 20 gal tank in the US is $120 per year in most places.

We have pretty similar tastes in beers, and I am amazed that you have been able to sample so many! Did you live or study abroad (from the Philippines)?

My hops and yeasts finally arrived from the US (3 agonizing weeks, with no package tracking)! My first Filipino batch will be a strong version of Guinness (hopefully). Malting is a pain in the A**. Probably 25-50% of the barley didn't germinate, so I'll just use that proportion as "Flaked Barley" and use a little more base malt (I'm guessing it's 6-row). Separating all the other bird seeds and weevils from the barley is also a pain. I've gotta start importing some malt from the US, since home malting is just too time consuming with mixed results. I'm glad to hear that you are also importing malts, but I guess you are still malting the majority of your grain bill yourself.

I found 3/8" copper tubing at Dan Bros. Refrigeration in Las Pinas (on Alabang-Zapote Road), in case other Filipino brewers are looking into making their own wort chiller and pre-chiller. Still have to put it together and finish my mash tun (picnic cooler), then I'm ready to fire up the Dry Irish Stout!

Slainte

P.S. - About Red Horse: I don't think it is a lager (at least it doesn't taste like a true lager). More like "Ice" beer made from malt liquor, similar to Colt 45 or Old English 800. Most of the Filipino beers taste sweet to me now (except for San Mig Pale and Light). I can't wait to start brewing, but it will be a few weeks more until I have the time for a brew day.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Mar 11th, 2011
2:52 pm
Thanks jmario666,

The only time i went abroad was last July in Thailand. I've studied my entire life in the Phils including beer education. A Dutch friend of mine gave me a Beer deck (card of beer styles) as a birthday present. My mouth was watering as each style was described. My imagination was almost tasting the beers that it described when finally I went to Manila. I went to a Belgian Pub called Beers Paradise in Makati. It's in the red light district beside a spanish restaurant senor alba. Wow! they serve their beers in the proper glasses. A Duvel for a Duvel, Chimay for a Chimay, Kwak for a Kwak, etc.. It's quite expensive though (average PhP250/bottle) but it was worth it as it was the defining moment for me to pursue this hobby.

Malting is really a pain, the entire process takes 5 days to a week. And i usually sleep every 4 hours at night just to check the soaking and rest periods, checking the moisture content, and most importantly, the germination stage, where it is very crucial to turn over the grains every2-3 hours and mist spraying them with ice cold water and deciding when to stop! You really cannot achieve the desired result without the proper equipment. You gotta have a food dryer with a PID controller. We are in the food business so I have special equipment to do those stuffs.

So Goodluck to your all grain brew and Cheers!

Peppo

P.S. send me your address in skype so i can send you some malts, crowns and other stuffs.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: domvmd
Jun 16th, 2011
2:20 pm
Hi Filbrewer,

I'm just beginning to start homebrewing here in Manila and you mentioned "beer education" here in the Philippines. How did you learn? I only have resources from the web and youtube home videos on how homebrewing is done. Like you, San Miguel's getting old for me. I haven't even made my first batch and I am eager to start ASAP. My problem is just the ingredients to start with.

Thanks bro!

Dominic
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: jmario666
Jun 17th, 2011
8:16 am
Hey Dominic,

I am also a homebrewer in Metro Manila (Bacoor, Cavite, technically). There is also supposed to be a guy who really has his homebrew together in Paranaque (http://sudsmagazine.com/tag/philippines/). An acquaintance of mine also wants to homebrew too, but so far he's just dreaming. I'm finishing assembly on my Germinator to semi-automatically malt the barley (and hopefully wheat/trigo). Then I need to make a barley crusher. Finding materials is difficult here, but exciting.

The impossible finds are barley malt, hops, and yeasts (for beer). You can malt your own barley from feed stores, but hops and yeast must be ordered from US, China, Australia, or Europe. I'm trying to get a brewery tour with Pivo Praha microbrewery in Makati, and if that falls through, maybe San Miguel. I'm hoping that Pivo Praha will be willing to sell me a bag of malted barley every six months or so - but not counting on it yet. If I get a tour with Pivo, do you want to join in? Anyone else around Manila want in?

The only other option for barley malt is ordering a container full from US or China, but that appears to be on the order of US $5000-10000. It would take a lot of homebrewers to consume that much malt before it gets too old here in the Philippines. But I would definitely like to investigate that route (especially if there is interest). Malting barley is a pain.

If you have enough money, just order malt or Dried Malt Extract (DME) from the homebrew suppliers in small amounts to get you started (you'll have to order hops and yeast anyway). Also, you should by a Barley Crusher or Monstermill (do not have your grains pre-crushed, they will be worthless by the time they arrive in the Philippines). So far, I have not found a homebrew supplier to load up a full bag or two of grain to put on a ship for delivery. It just isn't a big enough order and paying priority mail or FEDEX/UPS is not feasible. I still need to have someone load up a Balikbayan box full of malt for me, though. Even that will add a lot of shipping cost to the grain bill.

As far as beer education goes, the first place to start is http://www.globalbeerexchange.com.ph/ and http://www.facebook.com/GlobalBeerExchange. They have a Tasting Room in Makati and a Tasting Corner in Bonafacio Global City, plus their craft brewed beers are available all over the Metro. I'm actually having a tasting of my first Philippines-brewed beer at their Tasting Room on Saturday, June 18th (tomorrow), if you can make it. It would be great to meet you and talk to you about brewing. Please sign up on the Facebook page for a sure spot on the guest list (pouring starts at 6 p.m.). [Sorry about the plug, I didn't set out to plug it here]

As far as homebrewing education goes, the websites and forums will help you a lot, but you will have to weed through the information for what will work with your equipment and ingredients. I will try to post a short primer or good website to get you the best information I know of on how to get started (but I need time to look that up too). If I can't find much, I'll post or e-mail you my current methods.

Cheers,
Mario (jmario666@hotm@il.com) [I've replaced the "a" with another "@" symbol, just to try to deflect spambots]
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Jun 17th, 2011
3:11 pm
Hey fellas,

Dominic, pare, I learned how to brew last year with the help of Booksale, a book and magazine 2nd hand shop located at all malls in the country. They have BYO magazines, Beer magazines, Zymurgy and Beverage World. I did not know that brewing information existed in the Web (so stupid of me!). Then I browsed at some websites and other brewing forum in the net, then the addiction resided in my body. I made my first extract batch, pretty decent Pale Ale and then progressed to all grain after my 3rd batch. I make most of my base malts and some aromatic and kilned malts, experimenting on crystals still. For the yeast, I always save at least 4 pure cultures in slants. All are from Wyeast such as Trappist High Gravity, Belgian Strong, Forbidden fruit, Belgian Wit, Saison, Czech Pils, Bavarian Wheat. I have 2 stir plates to propagate them to their proper pitching rates.

My brewing setup is a 10 gallon stainless kettle and a 10 gallon rubbermaid cooler with an improvised stainless screen mesh as false bottom. 2x5gallon glass carboys and 7x6.6gallon glass carboys from a european surplus shop in Ozamiz city and some plastic Ale Pails. I have 2 chest type freezers that has been converted with a temperature controller for fermentation and dispensing the finished beer from a keg. My beer tower taps are arriving soon. Just stick in this forum and you will learn a lot....If you don't get satisfying answers, call BrewboyBB for help. Go out and start doing the best hobby ever.

PS....you can text me anytime 09272432271

Hey Jmario. I haven't heard of you for a long time. It's good to hear that you're really serious with this hobby. I met the guy from Pivo, Mr. Joel Loresca, the Master Brewer. Say, why don't we meet up next weekend for a beer chat and of course, some beer. I'll be in Manila sometime next week for the entire week. I posted my number above, just send me yours so we could communicate.

Thanks Fellas.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: brewboy_BB
Jun 17th, 2011
3:16 pm
These tropical brewers are lengthy typers.

They must use more than 3 fingers.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: domvmd
Jun 17th, 2011
3:16 pm
Thanks for the info Mario, your a pioneer for Manila homebrewers. I'm definitely interested in having a brewhouse tour in Pivo.

Goodluck on your first beer tasting at the Tasting Room. I'd definitely want to taste your locally brewed beer however, I'll be in Novaliches tomorrow to attend a funeral. I'll see if I can catch up with you guys at the Tasting Room.

As for delivery of ingredients from the States like Midwest, have you heard of Johnny Air Cargo? I'm trying to get in touch with them to deliver goods for me. They've got a proxy address in the east coast which we can have the goods delivered to and they'll ship it to us. We pick up the shipment in Johnny Air Cargo SM MegaMall, no balikbayan relatives required. Delivery takes up to 5 days. I'm just worried about the status of Yeast if we have it delivered through them.

I'll let you know how it works out with Johnny Air Cargo.

By the way, do we have problems with customs with the basic beer ingredients? (malts, hops, yeast?)

Thanks!

Dominic (dominic.velasco.md@gm@il.com)
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Jun 17th, 2011
3:29 pm
Here's a short note for BB. Why don't you share your blessings and send in some ingredients here!
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: brewboy_BB
Jun 17th, 2011
3:34 pm
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Jun 17th, 2011
3:38 pm
Relief Efforts from tastybrew members. Just like USAID, they send some goods here. hahaha
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: domvmd
Jun 17th, 2011
3:42 pm
Thanks Filbrewer, its off to Booksale for me as well. Your homebrew setup is pretty intense!
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Jun 17th, 2011
3:47 pm
nobody buys them in the phils. If they have it on stock, they're probably 3 years old
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: jmario666
Jun 20th, 2011
8:28 am
Hey Dominic,

I had not heard of Johnny Air Cargo. Seems pretty good, 5 days is very quick. Their sea bound cargo route is probably much more cost-effective but I think they only go to sea from New York - and I haven't found a homebrew supply there, yet (probably is one though). There is also Bongo International, but they are very, very expensive. I would primarily focus on obtaining dried yeasts (Fermentis, Danstar, etc.). Most of the brewers on this forum seem to like the dried yeasts just as good as the liquid cultures, and non-refrigerated storage should be tolerated for a few weeks. In case the yeasts don't work, it is good to have other dried yeasts as backup options (and do a starter to make sure your yeast is viable before brewday). Then, you can have relatives bring you over some liquid yeasts in their checked luggage, since they would only be out of the fridge for about a day. My only shipment directly here was not inspected by US or Philippine customs, so I don't have much experience. It was just pellet hops and dried yeasts, so shipping grain is another matter. Don't send Pale DME with your relatives in their balikbayan, since it is a white powder, they have to open it and inspect it (it got all over my mother-in-laws clothes - but it was easy cleanup). Darker colors of DME may be less scrutinized.

Hey Filbrewer,

See you next week, maybe Dominic can meet us too. Did Joel give you a tour of Pivo Praha? Maybe he'll be more willing to give us a tour if all 3 of us can go at once.

Cheers to Brewboy_BB, I'm just glad you check out a forum that doesn't apply much to you, since ingredients and equipment are so readily available for you. I will try the overnight mashing that you do, when I finally get my stuff together for another batch.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: jmario666
Jun 22nd, 2011
3:16 am
Hey Dominic,

Here's a good starter link for your beer brewing education: http://www.beersmith.com/blog/2008/02/16/ten-top-tips-for-home-brewing-beer/

They have lots of other tips on their website (most are pretty good, but I don't follow them all to a T). I do not yet use BeerSmith Software, but it seems pretty good for creating and cloning your own recipes, storing recipes you gather, and calculating your beer's vital statistics and brewhouse efficiency, etc. It should also make recording your beermaking adventures easier, so that you know what you did for each batch. It might be too much info to start out with, though.

Brew Your Own Magazine also has a great website with lots of recipes and tips from Mr. Wizard (not the guy from TV): www.byo.com

Cheers
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: aussiebrewer
Jul 2nd, 2011
6:04 am
i've been brewing here in australia for 30yrs and am seriously considering moving to Cebu and starting a very small at first, micro brewery(see if it sells). Filbrewer how does your feed barley perform with lighter styles as in the clarity of the finished beer, is it hazy or clear? Thinking of starting off first just with one beer a pale ale.
Anyone know of a bottle manufacturer in cebu besides san miguel, maybe they would not want to sell to another beer maker.
I have a contact here that is selliing a enzyme product that you can use instead of malting just add it to the barley and it will go to work, will be doing some experiments here with it using australian feed barley, there is a philippine agent for it also, havent got the contact details yet but will keep you posted. if all goes well i will be in cebu and maybe can supply you with the product ? Depending on the cost of course. I'm having a sample sent to me this week so should be able to put it to the test next week .
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: domvmd
Jul 2nd, 2011
9:32 am
Hey aussiebrewer, I like your idea of useing enzymes too. I've been looking for a distributor here in the Philippines also. I came across of enzymes for brewing using this link (http://www.biokemi.org/biozoom/issues/522/articles/2368). You've probably seen this too. Hence I only know of Novozyme. I've been trying to contact them for a distributor in the Philippines however, they haven't answered my mail.

Let me know how your enzyme + barley experiment goes.

I am a on my way to brew my first batch (waiting for ingredients to arrive...)
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: remm
Jul 2nd, 2011
1:52 pm
Hi Brewmasters,

I'm from the Philippines too and I have been searching online for basic homebrewing materials. My fascination with beer started when I tasted Hoegaarden, Guinness and Carlsbergs (a wonderful escape from the monotony of San Miguel). Because of this, I wanted to try homebrewing and I am fortunate that I have found this thread.

I am temporarily assigned in a project in Australia, and I have learned that there is such a thing as Do-it-yourself beer from Cooper's:
http://store.coopers.com.au/products/diy-beer

I have bought two cans of beer mix to somewhat "jumpstart" my homebrewing hobby (having absolutely no knowledge of brewing) when I get back to our country. Each of the cans contain a sachet of yeast for fermentation. I would like to know if it's possible to reuse this yeast (which is possible accdg to some websites) because brewer's yeast is not readily available in the Philippines. Has anyone ever tried this? Is the yeast from the DIY beer mixes reusable?

Cheers!
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: aussiebrewer
Jul 2nd, 2011
2:50 pm
Hi remm, yes you can reuse any yeast, but i recommend you get yourself a pack or two of a quality beer yeast like fermentis lager or ale yeast from a home brew store, it is much better then the ones with the can. Just remember cleanliness and trying to sterilize everything that comes into contact with the beer is most important. When the brew has a good head of steam 2nd or 3rd day draw off a couple of bottles make sure they are sterilized and rinsed with clean water, cover with plastic wrap and put into refridgerator, the fermation will cease in those bottles so next time you have a brew ready just take out of fridge a few hours before to aclimatise then add to brew and away it goes. Maybe on the can it says to add a kilo of sugar but i dont recommend that as your beer will have a sour taste, get a kilo of dextros from the HB store also, use it instead. Good luck with it
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: aussiebrewer
Jul 2nd, 2011
2:56 pm
hi domvmd, yes Novozyme is what i will be using, the rep here tells me there is a distributor in the philippines will get contact details later, i think they will only deal with commercial users, but i explained what i may be doing and she agreed to send me some to experiment with.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: aussiebrewer
Jul 2nd, 2011
5:43 pm
jmario666,I know of a bloke in north australia, growing hops at 19S lattitude
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: jmario666
Jul 4th, 2011
2:40 am
Hello Aussiebrewer,

Good luck on starting the microbrewery in Cebu. Can I convince you to start in Manila instead? No really, Cebu would probably be a great location, I just want more local options. The enzyme addition process would make it simpler and easier to make beer from raw barley (I would not know about the haze it produces, since my first homebrew here was a stout - I knew it would cover a lot of mistakes). You could always filter the beer before packaging (which would be what major beer producers would do, which are probably the targeted customers of Novozyme's products). Since manual laborers are so cheap here, I would just plan to train some people to do the malting, drying, and roasting of the feed barley. You are going to need some malted and roasted barley to get the correct color and flavor profile for a Pale Ale, and if you plan on adding any other beers - you'll definitely need some more malt options. Or you can just have the malt shipped from overseas. Since, you're going to have to have hops shipped in, so might as well fill up the shipment with malted barley from reputable suppliers.

Call me old fashioned, but I think my homebrew should be made traditionally (as much as possible). While it would be nice to add some enzymes in case my mash doesn't have enough diastatic power to get the job done, it is a bit of an easy way out.

As for hop rhizomes, there is a potential problem of getting them shipped to the Philippines and past customs. Since they only are shipped in the Spring, I have to have someone bring them to me after a well-timed visit to the States. Shipping by sea would kill the rhizomes and shipping by air would be cost-prohibitive, and still probably take 5 days (which also might kill them). So for now, it will have to wait. Since you can only use them for aroma hops (unless you can test the alpha acids or just want to take a chance), I would still have to get bittering hops from the States.

And there are no HomeBrew shops here (I'm assuming that's what you mean by "HB". But dextrose monohydrate can be picked up at some animal feed stores (Pacifica Agrivet, usually).
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Jul 4th, 2011
1:30 pm
Wow! Novozymes products can really help us a lot, but I hope it does not take away the fun of brewing. If you guys come across where to buy it in the Phils please do share it here.

Aussiebrewer, my Australian alter ego, Invite us on your microbrewery launching....it's just an overnight boat trip from my place. My malts are clear, I never had any clarity issues since using them, although I use fining agents even before. The cloudy issues can be addressed by carefully and thoroughly pulling out the rootlets ( I guess it contains mostly proteins). Cebu is such a fantastic place, there's a local bar where hoegaarden and guiness are served on tap....it's at joker's arm.

I can't believe my first thread/post I authored would draw in more brewers in the country. I hope Philippine brewing scene rapidly catch up with other countries. One of these days all of us should meet and discuss where we're heading and stuffs like that.

Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: remm
Jul 8th, 2011
5:20 am
Hello aussiebrewer,

Thanks for the tip! By the way, are you from Sydney? Do you know of any good brewery stores in CBD/Circular Quay that sells brewer's yeast/Novozyme?

Cheers!
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: aussiebrewer
Jul 10th, 2011
11:02 am
Hi remm, I'm not from sydney, but you should be able to find a home brew store near where you are to get a better yeast, you wont find novozyme products as they only do commercial sales.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: aussiebrewer
Jul 11th, 2011
2:32 am
1st report using the enzyme product and barley, went and bought some feed grade barley from feed store, done a pale ale on Saturday all went well, OG 1042 a little better then i was expecting had i been using malt. Just starting to ferment last night so will now see how it turns out, will be going out of town for 10 days so will keg it when i get back.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: brewslee
Jul 11th, 2011
7:28 am
Hi everyone,

I'm from also from the Philippines specifically Manila and I've been really interested in getting into the hobby of home brewing. I've been reading and researching on it for months but I've run into the same problems as you guys had (lack of ingredients/equipment etc). I see that Filbrewer has managed to be successful in making his own beer and I'm glad to see other people with the same interest.

To be honest, I'm going to be starting from scratch and I have very basic knowledge of brewing. Any tips,advice,guidance on what to do/where to get stuff/how to acquire ingredients/what to get first/how to start home brewing in general etc, will really be helpful. Where do you get most of the equipment here in Manila? How do you learn more about different styles of beer and how to get recipes(any good books/websites out there)? How do you ship ingredients not found here in the Philippines(if you don't have relatives in the US)? I have all these questions that I think you guys have answers to. And being a young lad of 23, I'd appreciate it if you guys can give me some cost effective tips or advice in getting into this craft.

I'm still intimidated by the technicalities and details that go into brewing but I'm definitely willing to learn from whatever you guys can share. This thread is just a godsend and I'm so glad I stumbled onto it. Hope to hear from you guys soon!

Thanks!

Lee
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: jmario666
Jul 11th, 2011
8:12 am
Hey Lee,

Welcome to the obsession! I'm putting together a meeting for the Philippines-based homebrewers and want-to-brewers in the next month or two. It will be a show and tell format, so I can show you how I do homebrewing (not that there is a right way) - everyone can discuss and ask questions. It's just in development, as of today - but it will happen. Keep checking this thread, and if you're on Facebook - sign up with the Global Beer Exchange page. There are at least 6-10 people in the Philippines interested in homebrewing (and a few that have perfected it, like Filbrewer).

As far as finding equipment and ingredients in Manila I have no clue. My fermenters and kettle were shipped from the US. Hops and yeasts have also been shipped in. I have not used Balikbayan box or container shipping yet, so I can't help you there either. Only two Homebrew suppliers in the US have I found to be able to ship directly to the Philippines: www.morebeer.com and www.midwestsupplies.com.

If you have not read this blog: http://homebrewinghobby.blogspot.com, it is a must-read for Brewers of the Philippines. Almost everything you need to start homebrewing is mentioned, from malting and to finding suitable fermentation vessels. [By the way, does anybody know what happened to Dan Carol after his last entry in that blog?]

Most of the equipment you really need can be sourced here in the Philippines: big pots for boiling/heating water, cooler for mash/lauter tun, copper tubing for wort chilller, kegs and CO2 from soda vendors (if you are lucky), and plastic water bottles/carboys for fermentation. Continue reading up on what you need, then start keeping your eyes peeled for the stuff you need to acquire and put together.

Good luck BrewsLee! (great name!)
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: brewslee
Jul 12th, 2011
5:40 am
Hi jmario666,

Thanks for all the information! That meeting sounds promising, I think I can learn a lot if that pushes through. Here's to hoping that it does! I'll keep an eye out for it and any other tips that I can get from this thread. I still have lots of work to do but I believe it's going to be worth the effort!


Cheers and hope to hear from you guys soon!
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Jul 13th, 2011
1:26 pm
Hey Lee,

Welcome to this hobby. For the equipments, you need to find a local laboratory shop to buy a testing instruments like a good digital or dial thermometer range 0-100c or a little over that, a hydrometer or a brix refractometer (w/ATC). As your brewing knowledge progresses, your desire to know more requires you more stuffs so you might need some tubes and loops to inoculate yeasts. Just browse the yellow pages and you'll find a lot in the Metro. For basic all grain setup, go to any hardware (Ace, Handyman, Wilcon etc) you need a 20gal cooler (rubbermaid, coleman, igloo) and replace the faucet with a brass or SS ball valve. Buy some rubber or plastic gaskets, you will need to replace them from time to time. Insert a threaded nipple and here's the tricky thing....attaching your filter....either you use a false bottom as false bottom or a bazooka screen. Either way you need a SS mesh. Plan your design as shown in homebrew shops then go to binondo area and buy some, maybe they can weld it for you. For the brew kettle, use those very cheap 10gal (or more) SS kettle, brand is 555 from any chinese shop. Another tip, whenever you see those Japan surplus shops, take a look inside and I bet you can see a lot of stuffs needed for brewing, they're very good quality.

Hey Mario,

I am very pleased that you're organizing a meeting soon. Can't wait for that.

Salut

Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Zhaosheng
Jul 14th, 2011
1:27 am
Filbrewer and brewslee,

I am a brewer in Singapore. So we are in a similar situation in terms of climate conditions. I am luckier here as we have a group of regular homebrewers and 2 suppliers supplying us with our brewing needs.

I have a website that have some great information on how to get your first brew done (ok, i dont want to be shamelessly advertising). Some online resources like http://www.howtobrew.com/ is free and very useful.

Forumers here will also help you out lots.

Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: domvmd
Jul 14th, 2011
3:06 am
Just bought the book at amazon kindle (How to Brew by Palmer), really informative stuff.

Zhaosheng, I'll be in Singapore this September kindly tell me how to get to your homebrew retail stores. I'm staying in a hotel with quick access to the EW11 Subway service. It's been a while since I've visited Singapore...

Filbrewer, what brand of refractometer, thermometer or hydrometer do you use? I'm also planning on harvesting and cultivating brewer's yeast from bottle conditioned beers. Do you have any experience with that?

jmario666, I'm interested in watching you guys brew, I'll check out that facebook page. In fact I'll be signing up right now. It would be great if you can send us a picture of your set-up in facebook!

Thanks guys!
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Jul 14th, 2011
12:13 pm
Hi Dominic,

I'm using ATAGO refractometer, dial thermometer is Cole Parmer, digital is a dual pH-thermometer EUTECH. I forgot the hydrometer, its from my first brewkit from Midwest. Brands do not really matter much as long as they give good readings. You can buy a cheap digital thermometer at S&R for P300, its in F, no celsius.

I have not yet done that but I wanted to try it. Be warned that breweries use a different strain for bottle conditioning and fermentation. I need to know first which I am sure of before i even attempt to inocculate.


peppo
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: jmario666
Jul 15th, 2011
3:55 am
Here's a link to info about yeasts that you can obtain from bottles: http://www.nada.kth.se/~alun/Beer/Bottle-Yeasts/

Not very many of them are available here, though. When you go to the homebrew supplier, just buy all the available strains of dried yeast packets and use those to start your yeast bank. There is one of almost all the main types of ales and lagers, then you can add the subtle qualities from other yeasts that you can get from liquid cultures or rescued from bottles.

You will spend a lot of your first batches perfecting the malting, mashing, and fermentation temperature control - so detecting the nuances added by the yeast type may be difficult to discern. Most of the regulars on this forum, profess to just using Fermentis US-05 or Danstar Nottingham for damn near everything (Maybe only their lager, wheat beer, and Belgian-type beers would use something else). You might buy a backup up packet or two for some types, in case they don't take off - or you aren't ready to start your yeast bank, but want to brew up anyway.

The show and tell will not be a brewing session, it takes too long. And then I'd have to transfer a full carboy of pitched wort back home. We can just go through the motions and talk about what would happen during brewing. I will try to take pictures of my setup, but dragging it all out for pics is not high on my list of things to do. Right now, I'm looking at the last Saturday of August for the Homebrew Show-and-Tell - so try to keep that evening clear.

Cheers,
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: brewslee
Jul 15th, 2011
3:08 pm
Hi everyone,

Thanks for all the tips and advice. Hopefully I can get the time to gather most of the equipment I will be needing and take it from there. But I really appreciate you guys pointing me in the right direction. Been reading a lot more about brewing and I still tons to digest. I just hope to be as knowledgeable as you guys are. I'll be visiting this forum often and I'll keep you guys posted on any progress I make.

I'm definitely blocking of the last weekend of August for that Homebrew Show-and-Tell. Can't wait for it.


Cheers!
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: jmario666
Jul 26th, 2011
2:58 pm
Attention homebrewers (experienced and inexperienced) and curious enthusiasts: Come to the Homebrewers Show-and-Tell at the Global Beer Exchange Tasting Room in Makati on Saturday, August 13 at 6 p.m.

I will bring most of my brewing equipment for showing everyone the types of equipment and techniques for doing your own home brewing. We can also discuss the various approaches to homebrewing (since there is no "right" way to homebrew).

It will also be a good opportunity for the experienced brewers of the Philippines to discuss their techniques and share ideas and tips. Please RSVP at the Global Beer Exchange Facebook page to let us know if you can make it. No purchases or cover charge required.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: brewslee
Aug 9th, 2011
1:54 pm
Hi Mario,

Sounds awesome! Count me in!


Cheers!

Lee
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: aldousbee
Aug 19th, 2011
10:03 am
Filbrewer, would you sell malt ba?

I would like to start homebrewing my first batch.

I'm based in Manila and It's quite expensive and tedious to obtain ingredients here.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Aug 19th, 2011
10:59 am
aldousbee - text me 09272432271
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: aldousbee
Aug 23rd, 2011
3:13 pm
guys,

I found this old message from one yahoogroups regarding beer yeasts that are available from DOST. Anyone who tried these strains? Taguig is just next town from me so I was thinking of checking it.

Also, I checked the UPLB Biotech page and they have amylase (converts carbohydrates to simple sugars) http://biotech.uplb.edu.ph/index.php/products/60-foodandfeedenzymes would this be useful?

Thanks!
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: baltoed
Sep 3rd, 2011
2:36 am
INTRODUCTION

Add another to the ranks of in the Philippines.. Homebrewer? no..still novice so lets say a wannabe. Im in Roxas City, Capiz on the island of Panay. Retired US and settling in I almost ready to free up some time for hobbies..< Right Asawa?- LOL>

So now Im in earnest with the learning process and trying to see if I can develop a process that will work for me given all the difficulties and barriers presented here in the Philippines. I welcome open dialogue with all people that are making brewing in the tropics successful for themselves and look forward to you becoming my mentors in this

Happy Brewing

Ed
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: baltoed
Sep 3rd, 2011
2:44 am


jMario: Homebrewers Show-and-Tell at the Global Beer Exchange Tasting Room in Makati on Saturday, August 13 at 6 p.m.

So how did that go? It would be nice to know..

thanks

Ed
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: baltoed
Sep 3rd, 2011
2:52 am

quote : if the grain is infected with fusarium...

Filbrewer..you sound like a man that worked in a brewery at sometime?..

anyways..the fusarium and locally avail feed grain .. sounds to me as if there must be some kinda of *speed check* that will prevent Micro and even large commercial brewers from making the mistake of using it to malt. Have you ever investigated that path of homebrewing?


Ed

Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: baltoed
Sep 3rd, 2011
3:15 am

SHIPPING FROM THE USA

When I moved here I did the foolish thing of shipping all my stuff thru balikbayan boxes. Over 60 - but the reason I say this is I developed a trust for a bb shipper Forex Cargo. They run another website www.pobox.ph that you can ship things to them and they will fill your box and ship it to you. I also bet that the pinoy who I used in Maryland would also accept your items and reship them to you. Ask me if you want to know more


Ed
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: baltoed
Sep 3rd, 2011
3:19 am
Filbrewer : I texted you..the number above..

so you know who it was..hehe


Ed

Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Sep 3rd, 2011
5:35 am
Hi Ed,

Sorry wasn't able to receive it. I live in an area where cellphone signal is as scarce as barley malt, so please send message again. I never worked in a brewery, only in my home brewery. Not as good as the others but still studying to perfect this craft
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: baltoed
Sep 3rd, 2011
7:41 am
Filbrew

Sure will..here is my email..any here are welcome to contact me thusly


Ed

balto_ed@yahoo.com

THanks guys
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: thava
Sep 3rd, 2011
2:17 pm
Hi guys,

I'm a newbie brewer from the tropics too, Malaysia to be precise. Bought some equipment from Singapore. Started with a Coopers Lager Kit then a Coopers Stout Kit, was successful batches. Got excited and became more experimental, brewed with plain LME and added tropic flavors using lime, ginger flower bulbs, mint, clove and cinnamon. It went down so smooth under the sweltering sun! Went well with the local critics! Now brewing something more extreme, in conjunction to the eid festivities and abundance to certain material, a specialty brew using arabian dates, arabica coffee, liberica coffee, brown sugar and local coconut sap sugar called 'gula melaka'. I'm gonna pitch soon so wish me luck.....
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: baltoed
Sep 4th, 2011
3:05 am
Thava;

Hello and welcome. Id be interested in the contacts of your Singapore equipment suppliers. As others can tell you outside of the US I have only iinvestigated Australia & New Zealand as sources and their pricing was totally too high when compaired to the USA.. Here in the Philippines they make tuba out of the coconut sap..ewww..*shutter* I seriously do not know how they drink it.

oh..did you know your account is blocked from viewing? I just asked as I didnt know mine was and just went in and changed it

Ed
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: thava
Sep 4th, 2011
2:25 pm
Ed,

thanks and do check http://www.ibrew.com.sg/

the trick for me was I got someone to bring in the stuff from Singapore to Malaysia. So there was no charge for shipping and u know its just a causeway separating singapore and malaysia. tuba is done in open fermentation method right using the natural occurring yeast, similarly it's called toddy here. I'm not a fan too, the aroma is kinda turn off, some swear by the taste and smell.... its healthy too especially when it's just left to ferment a day or two... very lil alcohol full of nutrients.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: jmario666
Sep 5th, 2011
1:00 am
Wow, this thread is still going strong after 9 months! Just when I think it's dead, it pulls me back in...

Hey Aldous,

The alpha-amylase product(s) from UPLB would help you if you need to convert the starch, and would be a way of accomplishing a mash conversion without using malted barley. Which is especially desirable if you want to do commercial level brewing and want to save on the expense of obtaining malted barley. Or, if your mash fails to convert all the starch, add a couple of drops.

For me, I want to make beer - and that is preferably made with barley malt. If you use barley malt, you will have plenty of excess amylase to chew up a good portion of adjuncts like unmalted barley, rice, wheat, rye, etc. Obtaining quality malt in the Philippines is getting a lot easier (through Global Beer Exchange) on a small scale (15 - 20 kg at a time). Another option we have is to go together filling up a container for shipping here.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: jmario666
Sep 5th, 2011
1:07 am
For BaltoEd,

The Show-and-Tell was pretty good, we had about 5-7 interested in starting homebrewing and there was one other true homebrewer there (Allan Agala from Paranaque). He also has quite a bit of malt available, which will help get some budding brewers started. We can also probably use his sources and contacts for future deliveries to the Philippines. He is trying to get his own microbrewery going, called Great Island's Brewing Company. I got to try 5 of his brews, which are pretty good - but they have been sitting in kegs for a few months, so not at the peak of freshness.

I'm hoping to get the Philippines' brewers together again in October, so if you have a date that you expect to be in Metro Manila, please post or e-mail me, and I will try to work it into your schedule.

On Fusarium, there is no simple test for it. The big malt companies use either ELISA or PCR detection, which are both very sensitive, lab-intensive techniques for determination of Fusarium. I've tried to determine if my barley and malt was infected using Potato Dextrose Agar, which did show some orange, brown colored molds from my unmalted barley - which was indicative of fusarium. But I tried to replicate the findings from my malt (which was made from the same barley) and was not able to get the orange color (and the shape of the molds was also different). So I think my beer is safe to drink, but I'm not 100% sure (it tastes damn good, and is not bursting any bottles yet!). I've also had a bunch of plates just grow spontaneously, which was from moisture condensation and the molds in the air contaminating the plate. So, getting a clear call on the fusarium with simple plate growth is within my possibilities right now (and I have a Masters in Microbiology). If only my asawa would approve a laminar flow cabinet. . . . The homebrew forums like to call her SWMBO.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: baltoed
Sep 5th, 2011
3:10 am
thave: Thanks ..and its a website in English..good for me


jMario: I know very little about brewing..newbie learner and its hard at my age..lol.. the addition of amalase is used for some stuck mash..but to properly work it needs a rest ..but I cant remember the temp.

Thanks for the feedback about the meetup.. by the way I see no place to email you? If you would pass it along to me great.

Global Beer Exchange.. I am talking with Jim Araneta over there . How did you ever find out he has malt to share? You certainly would not know that from his website.

Now I hate to even post but Im gonna. I surely hope it doesnt get me barred from here. Before I found this forum I looked and looked for a place to gather beer lovers and brewers for just the Philippines as I view the task hard to get the stuffs you need.. Long story short I started a website with multi forums that I think great to serve the yet to be established community. It has a few nice features but I have already typed more than I think might be allowable.. if you want to check it out please email me and Id gladly give out the URL. Its not really in competition with here or any other forum and I openly have a forum just to post the URL of all the other great sites that are in existance that should be visited.

< LIKE HERE >

. Again its for the Philippines and the tropics when it comes to homebrewing and that only is this one thread ..in so many others Hope to hear from a few of you here

Ed
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: jmario666
Sep 5th, 2011
3:32 am
Sorry I was going to put in my e-mail address: jmario666@hotmail.com

Depending on the source, the alpha-amylase would need a certain temperature to operate effectively. Probably around 65 deg C or 150 deg F (assuming it is from barley, wheat, or similar grain source). Just add it at the end of your mash, if the iodine test is positive for starch.

Don't even bother with the GBeX website, Jim never updates it anymore. Just friend them on Facebook. And the offer to ship materials is only open by invitation, which he has extended to the current and budding home-brewers of the Philippines.

Your URL did not come through in the post, but it is linked in your profile. Nice. I love the tribute to Dan the Canadian. Filbrewer and I talked about him when we met a few months ago, and we also concluded that he is likely dead or something. He was actively blogging from New Zealand or Australia before he moved to the Philippines, so it was surprising to see nothing from him after 2007. Where ever you are Dan, thanks.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: baltoed
Sep 5th, 2011
3:46 am
YES Don carol WAS A GO GETTER. In my research I found him actively running two blogs as well as the yahoo group. On one of the blogs he mentioned a business venture < the name slips my mind now> but I found no existance of it in any searches I made. I thought just possibly he got wrapped up in business and thus I could find him..

One of the members of Dons yahoo group went on to start BOGS BREW. I have emailed him..no reply as yet..and
btw..you have email..*grin*

Ed
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: aldousbee
Sep 5th, 2011
10:16 am
or we could try to find him.. unless he is dead
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: baltoed
Sep 5th, 2011
10:25 am
I have looked for Don..and I think Filbrew and jMario have as well.. Id welcome any super sleuth tactics you might have...*GRIN*

Ed

Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: jmario666
Sep 6th, 2011
3:41 am
I don't think there is any way to search for Dan Carol in the Philippines, maybe Filbrewer did some more thorough searching. Dan was toying with the plan to start his own malting factory, I think it was to be called Paradise. I did a search for it (when I had the name in hand), but nothing came up. According to his blog he was moving to Metro Manila, then nothing more was posted. Even if he is not dead, it is a sad loss to our knowledge base, since he was such a crafty and prolific blogger and brewer.

Starting a malting company here would be a good venture, you could sell to San Miguel. They buy primarily from India, I believe (according to an Indian Maltster website). But an even better option right now is to import malt and hops from US, China, Australia and start a mini-Homebrew supply business here. With the lack of supplies available to the individual homebrewer, you would have quite a good market and it would be easy to obtain profitable margins. Only problem would be to overstock on supplies or over estimate the demand here in the Philippines. But you could always just brew it up and sell the beer, I suppose.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: baltoed
Sep 6th, 2011
5:09 am


With Filbrew in the food business and admittedly has a 50 kilo dryer that he can dry malt in.. Id be hard put ..once getting to know him better..to put the *bug* in HIS EAR ! ! ..




SeeYa

Ed
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Sep 6th, 2011
6:31 am
just come on in to Iligan. Be my guest! 1 week work for 50 kgs of malt. Whew!
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: baltoed
Sep 6th, 2011
6:48 am
Actually I can hear me saying.. and that would be "who" that I make the check out too? ..lol

ED
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: aldousbee
Sep 6th, 2011
1:30 pm
Jmario, its "Progress Malting Philippines" - yup maybe Dan was a 3-4 years too early

I wonder how long can you store malt.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: jmario666
Sep 7th, 2011
1:44 am
I've heard 1 year of storage for malt is fine. Allan in Paranaque has malt that is about 9 months old (if I remember correctly), and the pale malt has a bit of a farm-y smell. Like a old barn full of hay. The roasted malts still smell awesome, but I did not check out his wheat malt.

When I used home malted barley, the smell was very clean and slightly toasty - but malting is such a pain on a small scale. Filbrewer does it right with 25 to 50 kg batches, but I cannot commit to that much work (nor do I have adequate drying ovens).

Most important is to protect from excessive moisture and barley weevils or other pests. Allan stores it well in large, sealable plastic drums. During mashing, Allan's malt still had that farm-like smell, but the wort smelled fine after boiling. Most of those compound were probably driven off by a good strong boil. Will transfer to secondary tonight, so I will see if the beer has a clean aroma (a good dose of hops wouldn't hurt anyway).
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: marvmoreno
Oct 10th, 2011
6:32 am
Hey guys!

Really refreshing to find beer enthusiasts here in the Phils! As for introduction, I'm a brewer wannabe who's just starting to read into what it really takes to become a brewer. Really passionate about beer, especially around the time when those imported brews became more accessible and affordable here in Manila. Realized I wanted to be a brewer and really turn this into a career or business in the near future

So I've done some research on just what it takes to brew, and through my extensive reading I found this forum and post. Glad to see so many enthusiasts and home brewers here in the Phils! I'm also thankful for all the useful advice you guys gave in this thread! Especially the one who posted about the Singapore home brewing store, as I am currently planning to order my ingredients there for a start

Just a quick question though, I haven't decided on what carboy to use. I was planning to buy one from the Singapore homebrew shop, but I'm also looking in to local options. Any advice/opinion on anything I can use here? Maybe those plastic carboy-like containers where they store water in? Are they viable options or is there a risk of maybe imparting unwanted odors and the like?

Hope to hear and learn more from you guys! More power to the Phil homebrewing scene!
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: jmario666
Oct 11th, 2011
1:11 am
Hey Marv,

Welcome to the homebrew scene of the Philippines. I'm organizing a meeting of the current homebrewers and wannabes/enthusiasts on Friday, October, 28th at 6 p.m., at the house of Baldis (a.k.a. Great Islands Craft Brewery) in Paranaque. He has a nice 10 gallon setup with 3 kettles, and all the bells and whistles. He uses the round plastic water carboys as fermentation vessels. He installed a round piece of plastic onto the bottom of the bottle to give it extra space (they only fit ~19 L, and you really should have ~25 L for primary fermentation to hold the krausen activity). Then, mounts them in a stand, inverted - so that they are similar to a conical fermenter. He reports no off flavors from the plastic. If you can't taste the plastic in water, it should be better with beer, since the malt and hops can cover some off-flavors. But I guess that alcohol could release some resins, so I guess you just have to wash it well.

So, I hope you can make the meeting. The night before, we are meeting at Craft Pub and Eatery in the Fort Strip, Bonafacio High Street. We will send out the directions to Baldis's brewery by e-mail, since we don't want to post the directions on the web for all eternity. Look for my e-mail address in this thread.

Also, you should join another forum started by baltoed at beerhere.org. It is dedicated to homebrewing in the Philippines. He can also put you on the e-mail list to be sure you get the directions for the meeting.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: brewslee
Oct 11th, 2011
7:34 am
Hi Marv,

Welcome to the obsession! I was also thinking of getting my other equipment and ingredients from brew stores in Singapore. It will definitely be quicker in terms of getting here instead of coming all the way from the States or even Australia. I've contacted one brew store and they said the charge for shipping by weight, 1 KG = $20 and $10 for every additional KG. (Since I have no idea how much shipping costs from the US, I don't know if this is cheap) I have yet to get a quotation on how much a complete beer brewing kit will cost. But I think there are things you can get here locally that would pretty much get the job done.

Hey Mario,

Sounds like another promising get-together of Philippine home brewers. I would definitely like it if I could come. The new forum looks to be real informative and very helpful to us wannabe brewers.


Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: marvmoreno
Oct 11th, 2011
8:27 am
Hey Jmario!

Thanks for the invite! I would definitely like to see that setup! I've read about him and it's nice to see people here are finally beginning to get into home brewing! I plan to get a proper fermenter online but I'll definitely try a setup like that with those mineral water plastic carboys once I get around the basics of brewing

Here's my email btw: marv_moreno@yahoo.com.sg. I'm definitely looking forward to meeting all other homebrew enthusiasts and learn a thing or two... over a couple bottles of beer, of course

Hey brewslee!

Nice name btw! I just emailed the Singapore homebrew shop (ibrew.com.sg) and asked around. Apparently they're offering the Cooper's DIY microbrew kit which contains everything you need to get started, even the ingredients and the bottles! It retails at S$175 and weighs around 8 kg. Did a quick computation and should cost a little around P9,000 including the shipping. Pricey, though, and not much flexibility on the ingredients, so I'm still thinking if I'm going to get this or just buy the ingredients and equipments separately.

Also, any of you guys know where I could buy bottles, bottle caps and a capper locally? I'm thinking buying them abroad will be a real pain, shipping wise

Hopefully I'll be able to brew my first batch within the month, tell me how your first brew goes (if you haven't already), maybe we could help each other out

Thanks guys!
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: brewslee
Oct 13th, 2011
6:45 am
Hey Marv,

Thanks for the info! I think it would be wise to get the ingredients and equipment separately just like the more experienced guys are doing. But a little creativity and some DIY skills may also prove useful especially when it comes to equipment.

As it stands, I am still on my way to brewing my first batch since I haven't found the space and time to begin brewing but I'll definitely update you once I do. I believe I'll need all the help I can get as I am just a novice.

Hi Mario,

Can I also get an invite to the meeting? I'd really like to see how more experienced brewers' set up. My email is leandrobdavid@gmail.com.

Many thanks!
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: jmario666
Oct 17th, 2011
2:32 pm
If you are in a rush, you can spend the money and buy a kit, either from the U.S., Singapore, or where ever. I started with Mr. Beer but found I had to add on or make equipment as I progressed to larger batches with partial mashing (extract plus brew in bag for grains), then to all-grain. If you can spend a little time and get the right info, you won't need to order a kit and can buy the right stuff the first time. And chances are you can find the majority of the items you would need and get everything built within a few weeks (which is probably what the shipping time is, even from Singapore). There is no equipment that I use that you cannot find a suitable replacement for here. Some things have to be made or you have to go to certain areas of Manila, but it is possible to brew without buying equipment abroad. But you will have to buy hops and yeast, and probably malt abroad - so add anything you can't find to that order.

You guys are on my list, so I'll make sure you get the directions. I'll probably send those out on Friday with some help from Balto_Ed. Cheers.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: remm
Sep 4th, 2012
5:34 am
hey guys,

how do you keep your fermentation temperature constantly to 16-24deg C here in the Philippines?
I've brewed my first batch but sadly it turned out solvent-like. I think because I brewed it at room temp (above 30 deg C here).

Thanks!
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Hopper5000
Sep 4th, 2012
5:27 pm
If you don't have a dedicated fermentation refrigerator you could try a swamp bath. Get a large rubbermaid cooler and put your carboy/bucket in there (it's helpful to have a thermometer strip on your fermenter to see what the temp inside is). Fill it up with some water (I usually do half way) and wrap a tshirt around it. The water evaporating off the tshirt will cool off the carboy, you can also point a fan at it to encourage more evaporation. You can also put some frozen waterbottles in the water to cool it down even more. Beers can heat up upwards of 10 degrees F beyond the ambient room temp.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Sep 5th, 2012
6:09 am
buy a chest type freezer (2nd hand) and add a temperature controller or do a water bath by periodically adding ice in the tub.

get a yeast strain that can go higher than the usual 24c
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: malcolmtiulim
Jul 26th, 2013
3:28 am
Hi

I am new to this home brewing stuff and would like to start in the philippines.

I would like to know where to get maleted barley here? filbrewer are you selling?
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: malcolmtiulim
Jul 26th, 2013
5:57 am
let us revive the micro brewery here!
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Hopper5000
Jul 26th, 2013
4:12 pm
you could get it online but shipping might be quite costly for you
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: dewslat
Feb 16th, 2014
8:44 am
@Filbrewer I just read this thread from a search.. im a noob and very interested in homebrew. I am planning to have my own setup here at home. I live in Cagayan de Oro, so its just 100kms away from your town.. I love to see your setup..
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Feb 16th, 2014
8:53 am
Sure, Text 09176200305
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: baltoed
Feb 16th, 2014
9:16 am
We are still around..right Mario....hehe..

Hey Joe Brewery
Custom Handcrafted Ales Since 2009
www.beerhere.org
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Feb 16th, 2014
9:24 am
Yeah, it's me, Mario and Ed.

Check out www.beerhere.org sign up and be a member. Introduce yourself and start reading old threads. Ask questions you don't understand and we're happy to help you.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: cujoach3
May 18th, 2014
4:44 pm
I'm brewing beer in Angeles now for a year or so. About 35 batches so far. Getting supplies in balikbayan boxes.

I just get sick of the locally available beer and wanted some real stuff to drink sometimes.

I've done the home malting thing with bad results - no Agrivet here and the locals don't seem to feed their fighting cocks barley in Northern Luzon {since noone knows what it is even in the feed stores}. I found one store that sells it but lots of weevils and less than 50% germination-about 6 batches so far.

I'd be interested in pooling with other people who want to bring in supplies. Malt and DME are readily available in China and cheap, but obviously you need a local importer to help, which is prohibitive unless you are already connected...

Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: aussiebrewer
May 20th, 2014
1:22 am
hey all, long time since i was here, my plans had to change for the time being, i wont be moving to phil until maybe 2016 some time, i have some information though on a source for novo pro enzymes, i have tried using it and it works well on feed barley.( connell bros)http://www.connellbrothers.com/Pages/philippines_en.aspx, they are also agents for fermentis yeast. Whether they will be willing to supply small amounts to homebrewers? You would still have to do some malting for the crystal malts etc.
I am making all my malt as i don't have access to malt where i'm living in aust.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: baltoed
Jul 17th, 2014
3:35 am
Might want to point the homebrewer in the Phils to the facebook beerhere.org as the website I so painfully labored over sits idle..
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: BB_BrewBoy
Jul 17th, 2014
10:31 am
OMG IT'S ALIVE!

After 9 days I thought maybe the plug had been pulled.

Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: mroakley
Jul 17th, 2014
2:56 pm
David says:

"OMG IT'S ALIVE!

After 9 days I thought maybe the plug had been pulled. "

Guess I can't complain. My comment here about David being horribly off topic is totally off topic as well. Drat.


I'll check out beerhere.org in a bit. Thanks for the link!
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: thomascirineo
Aug 12th, 2014
7:07 pm
hello filbrewer

hi im thomas from seattle, im based in davao now. How have your brewing operations been going? Let me know.
lets connect i read most of your posts.

I am in seattle right now for vacation. =)

okay take care, hope to hear from you.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Aug 12th, 2014
11:45 pm
Hey there neighbour,

I'm one of the first home brewers here in the PH together with Mario and Allan. I remained a home brewer despite other newbies who are now into commercial brewing. I have been upgrading my setup since I started and now it's almost a complete Electric Brewery. I still malt my own base grains (barley and wheat) and buy specialty malts in the USA as well as hops. Most of my hardware are from the USA too and a few local stuffs that I find replaceable.

Let's brew together someday.

Cheers!
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: baltoed
Aug 13th, 2014
3:34 am
Hey Thom.. if *I* was in Seattle right now I would not really call it vacation. Id be filling bb boxes and calling it stocks and supplies trip!! *LOL*

Ed

Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: cujoach3
Aug 13th, 2014
6:13 am
Filbrewer where do you get your grain that you malt?

I make a couple batches of beer a month, but have to get everything shipped in from the states in Balikbayan boxes.

If I could find a grain dealer who could put a couple sacks on a bus and ship it to me that would be great.

I have malted barley here in Pampanga many times and normally it's unusable for beer. It's probably very old or has been dried by heat which killed the grain, because most of it won't germinate. Also it tends to have a lot of weevils in it.

I keep buying a few kilos every time the feed store gets a new shipment in hoping that someday I will get good barley that I can buy the whole shipment, but so far not good results.

I know in other parts of the Philippines people use barley to feed their fighting cocks, but not here. The people in the grain suppliers don't know what it is mostly.

Thanks
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Aug 13th, 2014
11:28 pm
I buy it from my friend who owns the Agrivet store. He told me he gets it from Cebu. I usually buy 2 sacks a month depending on my brewing schedule.

I have the same dilemma, whenever I buy the remaining stocks from him, weevils are so plenty that the grains hardly germinate but when I buy freshly delivered, I get 2 or 3 sacks because I know they are still good. You know how their bodegas are maintained.

I prefer the rounded grain rather than the pointed grains. It's more plump with starches and has better pppg at 1.030

For the wheat, I get very good quality white wheat from some fisher folks who live nearby the Flour Milling Factory. It came from the delivery ship from USA or Europe. They said the ship crew sold it to them because these are the remaining wheat on the deck or hull that can no longer be sucked onto the silos, they sweep the floor any get 10 sacks.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: cujoach3
Aug 14th, 2014
7:23 am
That makes sense that the barley I'm getting might be really old. You got me thinking about that and the barley sold now is obviously at least 10 months old. The barley is from Canada, Agrivet is probably getting theirs from the same ships and it would be harvested in September.

The feed store I buy it in is the only one here that has barley and they only use 1 sack every couple of months, it's not really their expertise.

I have also malted wheat-trigo and it worked better than the barley for sure. I made part of it into crystal and mixed them together. I add about 5 % to my mash to stretch the grain not really for the taste.

I have enough grain from the states to last me a few more months then I might call Agrivet in Manila.

If I ask them when is the next shipment after the harvest in September there is a good chance it will be this year's crop.

So I'll try again.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: baltoed
Aug 14th, 2014
7:43 am
I take my hat off to Filbrew for his remaining to brew with local barley.. My results were pretty much just making wet barley hulls with buk buk aka weevils floating. And the wheat I got once did also work better. If you see a sack come in and its fairly full.. grab a hand full and cupping two hands give it a good shake..if your hand gets a fair coat of flour or dust..or lots of weevils..pass on it. But if it passes that crappy test maybe consider buying the sack and floor malting it. That should get you better results.and if weevils later becomes a nasty pest becaues there were tons in egg or larve stage then roast the malt or freeze it. Or again.. bite the bullet and buy US imported malt like the rest of us.

Ed
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: aussiebrewer
Aug 14th, 2014
7:56 am
Hi brewers, what do you think the craft brewers in Phil are doing, importing from china direct, or US/Europe, i think if you buy enough the Chinese malt is not so expensive, is malting done in china or is it imported in bulk then reexported which i suspect.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Aug 14th, 2014
8:03 am
One thing I noticed is that bukbuks or weevils don't like Malted grains.

They must be chewing starches only. Same with my corn and wheat, they only attack raw, unmated grains
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: baltoed
Aug 14th, 2014
8:29 am
One thing I noticed is that bukbuks or weevils don't like Malted grains.

They must be chewing starches only. Same with my corn and wheat, they only attack raw, unmated grains

Now that *IS* interesting..!!
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: aussiebrewer
Aug 14th, 2014
8:30 am
yeah that makes sense, the grain is altered when malted so it probably doesn't fit in with the life cycle of the weevil
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: aussiebrewer
Aug 15th, 2014
3:24 am
Filbrewer do you get almost 100% germination when you buy by the sack?
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Aug 15th, 2014
7:53 am
Never got a perfect score. The closest I get was at 90++% coz 9/10 germinated. Lowest score was below 40%, I mashed it with Amylase, fermented it and distilled. It was awful alcohol.

I always malt by the sack because my dryer can handle 50kgs at a time and still barley on sack has bukbuks.

Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: aussiebrewer
Aug 15th, 2014
8:17 am
yeah filbrewer, i get about 95+% here in aust also, dont have a problem with weevils, i make my own malt because i'm living too far from the malt suppliers and with freight costs it far better for me to malt my own using feed barley like you. you say you can dry 50kg of malt at one time, how long does it take to run the dryer to finish 50kg. i usually use the natural sun, but i just do 4kg at a time.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Aug 15th, 2014
8:23 am
Hi Aussiebrewer,

It takes 24hours to bring the moisture down to around 10-15% at 50celsius. I crank it up to 80celsius for 3-4 hours more for kilning. Total of 28 hours. I thought you're in Cebu.

Fil
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: aussiebrewer
Aug 15th, 2014
8:33 am
yeah my plan before was to move to cebu but i've been held up for family reasons, when it happens i want to brew there also, are you selling your beer or just a hobbie for yourself, friends and family to enjoy, 50kg will make a lot of beer !!
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Aug 15th, 2014
11:43 am
No, I don't. Just for myself and friends. I only make Pale, Vienna and Munich. I find it so hard to make a light coloured Pilsner though.

It's just a hobby and I have no plans in going commercial.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: thomascirineo
Aug 21st, 2014
12:14 am
Hola Filbrewer,

hope all is well, i have your txt number from your previous posts, can i have your email. you know i found fat pollys in iligan i would like to taste those beers. well thanks for your email, i will be in cdo early sept. thanks thomas
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Aug 21st, 2014
3:54 am
you can email me at peppoUNDERSCORErsdrATyahooDOTcom
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: junjimalaza
Dec 25th, 2014
3:12 am
Hi Filbrewer,

I am from Cebu, I have no experience in brewing beer yet, but I have done so fermenting fruit wine like pineapple. My concern is the temperature. I'd like to email you later. my email address is junjiDOTmalazaATgmailDOTcom

Have a happy holiday and cheers.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: makatibrewer
Dec 31st, 2014
4:54 am
Hi all,

I just starting brewing here in Makati on a small scale. I currently get my supplies (malt, hops, yeast) from Dave's Home Brew in North Sydney in small quantities when I go there a few times per year. They fit nicely in my suitcase

Has anyone been able to locate a local distributor for such supplies (e.g. base malt, >25kg) or a reliable, reasonably priced overseas supplier?

Thanks.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: IronTaipan
Jan 28th, 2015
4:59 am
Greetings Brewmeisters....

I just thought I'd drop in and say 'Hello', I've have been contemplating homebrewing for a while now thanks to a good friend back home (Australia) who has been a homebrewer for quite a few years now. I googled across this forum as I'm searching for places to buy the necessary individual pieces of equipment here in Makati/Manila without having to get a Coopers kit sent from home (I am actually from the home-city of Coopers coincidentally!). The thing is, trying to find suppliers online is quite challenging to say the least. Sure, it sounds like getting the raw ingredients (Malt extract, Hops etc) is going to have to be imported, but in terms of actual equipment that I can get...a bit trickier, apart from buying from hardware stores etc and doing some modifications. For example, getting a pail from Ace hardware and attaching a spigot & airlock. And, like errr, where on earth to find an airlock? haha, maybe I'll have to try make one...lol

Anyways, finding this thread is exciting and the commitment of users like Filbrewer to keep following the thread over a number of years is appreciated by a newbie such as myself, simply from a learning perspective. I have a lot to learn and hopefully I can contribute to this forum at sometime in the future with my journey. Any tips that anyone can provide on where to hunt down trickier pieces of equipment would be warmly welcomed and I should just mention that I'm looking to get the ball rolling with the basic Malt Extract brewing approach and building my experience from there.

If there are any meetups of Homebrewers here in Manila, would love to hear about those.

Take care & happy brewing.
Dee.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Jan 28th, 2015
11:39 am
Welcome IronTaipan - I heard it in Facebook that there's a home-brew shop now in Manila Go to beer here page in fB. For myself i home malt the base grains and buy the crystals and dark malts from abroad. Buying online from the USA is inevitable when you're into this hobby. Be patient with shipping schedules which can take 2 mos or more with POBOX.PH or FOREXWORLD. For hardware items, you can go to Sta. Cruz area for fittings, hoses etc but it is still more expensive than buying from Aliexpress which can take upto 20 days delivered to you. Just chose merchants who opt shipping to the Phils via China air post, Hong Kong post or Singapore Air post. Don't use EMS, DHL, Fedex they can charge you for customs duties.

Peppo a.k.a. Filbrewer
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: IronTaipan
Jan 28th, 2015
1:35 pm
Hey thanks Filbrewer, I just joined the Beerhere page today and the amount of information I'm seeing there will leave me pretty busy for days to come...I didn't get much work done today at all as i spent the whole time scrolling, reading, scrolling, reading and so on...Anyways, I'll have a look through Aliexpress now, thanks for the suggestion

Dee

Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: bbd
Feb 5th, 2015
4:42 pm
Hi IronTaipan/Filbrewer,

I'm new to this forum, and likewise living in manila. i just brewed my first batch last week. would like to get as much information as to how to do things right. As for the home-brew shop Filbrewer was mentioning, I recently checked out manilahomebrew and juanbrew as they were the best results i got from google. though manilahomebrew wasn't responding to my emails. i bought my 1 gallon kit from juanbrew which i used for my first batch. Also, there's someone from olx selling airlocks and other supplies for brewing (safale yeast, briess grains, hops, whirlfloc tablets) but I hadn't bought from him yet. i have yet to find someone who sells 6 gallon carboys though (and starsan). will be monitoring this page to see updates. goodluck with the brewing!

P.S. just registered in BeerHere, hoping it gets approved.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Feb 6th, 2015
1:51 am
Hi bbd,

Mr. Michael Nikkel of Cebu is selling his 6.5 gal carboys. Check out the Facebook page beerhere.

Filbrewer

Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: bbd
Feb 6th, 2015
5:31 am
Filbrewer,

yes, but i think i was too late for that. he mentioned he thinks it might be already sold. anyways, if you got news about where to get one here in manila, that would be great.

bbd
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: domvmd
Feb 6th, 2015
10:50 am
Hi everyone, it's been I while since I've posted. I've successfully brewed a lot (lost count already) using what I think is the most resource friendly and effective way given the situation we have here.

For my IPA I brew at a calculated 5 liters (meaning grains, hops, water, etc. Calculated for 5 liters with so = 1.035 to 1.045) I use Summit mineral water, Magnum and cascade pellet hops. I ferment them in the 6 liter Summit container. I sanitize with betadine bought at your local Mercury with 1.25ml to 1000 ml or 12.5 ppm dilution. I brew with the brew in a bag method. The bag is sewn using undyed curtain material bought at Carolinas in SM megamall. I have a spaghetti cooker that can carry 5 liters of water and yield 3 liters of wort. I add 2 liters of water to get the desired sg. I ferment in a cooler with gel packs. Temperature changes like crazy but usually I get 19 celsius in the am to 23 degrees celsius in the afternoon. Which I replace a frozen gel pack.

All ingredients are imported. Brought home by family and friends.

Hope I shed some light into our fellow local brewers.

This post is written using a mobile phone, I apologize in advance if it is unclear.

Dom
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: bbd
Feb 6th, 2015
1:00 pm
hi dom,

thanks for that information. think i could use this for the next brew. do you still rinse after sanitizing with iodine?

bbd
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: domvmd
Feb 6th, 2015
2:28 pm
bbd,

I do not rinse with water after sanitizing. The solution is diluted enough that it has no effects in taste or smell in the finished beer. Of course while sanitizing you will smell the betadine solution but the final beer product does not have any. I use it to sanitize everything and I have not experienced any infections to this date. I have been brewing since 2012.

dom
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: bbd
Feb 6th, 2015
3:02 pm
thanks dom! will surely try this out.

bbd
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: HB_In_Subic
Feb 9th, 2015
1:13 pm
It's nice to see that there are others out there. I am up in the Subic Freeport and am the only one home brewing here. I have been importing ingredients and equipment from the US. My current setup is a Standalone Freezer with a Johnson Control (analog) for my fermentation chamber, 3 buckets for primary and now only 1 carboy (for wine). My glass carboy got a crack in the bottom somehow and I won't risk using it. I use a wort chiller for the chill down along with a large cooler full of ice and water for the final cool down. I primarily do DME, specialty grains and dry yeast. I have made 35 batches over the last year (Reds, Ambers, Stouts, Porters and Saison) and really enjoy the process. I also started a batch of Mango wine (will be bottling that soon) and a batch of Hard Pear Cider which I will bottle this week. I am bottling with a combination of San Mig 1L, Red Horse 1L and some 1L flip tops I brought in from the US.

All of my friends (expat and fil) enjoy my beer but none seem interested enough in making it too...
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Feb 9th, 2015
1:39 pm
Hello Sir,

My friend is also brewing in Subic since last year. His name is Mark. You will love his setup, a DIY guy like me. He lives near Brent School. Look for Makoy in the Facebook page beerhere.

Peppo
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: HB_In_Subic
Feb 9th, 2015
2:32 pm
Peppo,

I don't see him listed on the member's list by either Mark or Makoy.

Jon
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Feb 9th, 2015
2:40 pm
Just look for Makoy Almanzor in facebook.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: HB_In_Subic
Feb 9th, 2015
2:43 pm
Ah ok, just tell him to look for a message from me in his "other" folder on facebook.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: redbrew
Feb 9th, 2015
7:22 pm
I am not a fan of carboys but I have used the 5 gallon plastic water bottles to ferment in. Use a blow-off tube and it will work fine. As for bottles, you would be amazed how well plastic Coca-Cola bottles work. 500 ml and the 2 liter ones.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: HB_In_Subic
Feb 10th, 2015
12:47 am
I only used the Glass carboy for my wine as it was just sitting idle (came with the homebrew kit I bought 2 years ago). I do not secondary. I just bought a 20L plastic one to rack the wine off too and will have to rack the excess into 1 L bottles.

I use the Coca Cola bottles when in a pinch. They work perfectly but the 1.5L and 2L ones can be a pain to stand up in the fridge. I save those for picnics at the beach and it works great in the cooler.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: bbd
Feb 11th, 2015
9:33 am
anybody got some alternative to PBW?
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: HB_In_Subic
Feb 11th, 2015
11:31 am
I use StarSan and/or One Step. I primarily use PBW for cleaning my kettle, getting rid of labels on the bottles and fermenters (let sit for a few hours and no scrubbing).

Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: aussiebrewer
Feb 12th, 2015
9:02 am
I got this tip from John Palmer's How To Brew, 4ml of bleach (no scent) to 1 lt of water, i've been using this for couple of yrs now and never had an infection, very happy with it and very cheap
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: mikeydabrewer
Mar 27th, 2015
5:48 am
I just ran across a brewery supplier in Hong Kong and Taiwan. I Met the owner Jessica and her husband Michael at a craftbrew festival in Hong Kong.
check out www.pbcraft.com and www.diybeersupply.com.tw

They already ship Hops, Yeast and Malt to breweries in Manila, Hong Kong, Taiwan and China. They supply many different malts like Dingamans in Belgium, Muntons in England and Best Malts in Germany. There website has lots of stuff. Maybe people can do a large group buy from them. They ship small packages, or pallets or or containers to breweries.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: mikeydabrewer
Mar 27th, 2015
6:36 am
anyone found wort chiller, I was thinking of making my own and pumping ice water through it using a small fish pond pump.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: HB_In_Subic
Mar 27th, 2015
7:09 am
It's pretty simple to make. You need at least 25-30' of 1/4" copper tubing, a couple of hoses, clamps and a hose adapter or whatever you need to attach to the pump you are proposing to use. Make the coil about 12" in diameter so that it fits well within you kettle.

I would be interested to see how well this works for you as my tap water is routinely 84F and I do a combo of wort chiller and ice bath to get my wort to pitching temps.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: HB_In_Subic
Mar 27th, 2015
8:56 am
Correction on the copper tubing... at least 3/8" and minimum of 30'.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: aussiebrewer
Mar 27th, 2015
10:05 am
cool the wort first using tap water through the chiller then when its about 45 to 50c run chilled water through it.
What i do during the summer months is chill it to 50c using tap water then, use a 2nd smaller chiller immersed in ice water to get chilled water into the main chiller
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Tonnex
Jun 23rd, 2015
5:36 pm
@dewslat @Filbrewer Hi, I'm also a noob from cagayan de oro. I really love beers and I'm planning on making a homebrew setup as well. Any way i can visit yours? I would really like to learn from you sirs
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Jun 24th, 2015
2:35 am
Sure. text zero nine one seven six two zero zero three zero five
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Chichako
Jul 1st, 2015
7:57 am
Hi Guys, I just joined the forum and am interested in getting back into brewing. I have been living in Manila for about 9 years and miss my hobby. I brewed for over 15 years before coming to the PI. I was considered an expert in the day with many medals and trophy's. I am also a BJCP certified judge although not active.
I am really interested in getting some mead going using the local wild honey. The big barrier is getting my hands on a couple of glass carboys. I am hesitant to use the plastic jugs because the mead will be sitting in the carboy for many months for conditioning.
Any help would be appreciated and I would love to meet up with other brewers here for a beer and some good conversation on my favorite topic.

Oh, I have also spent a bunch of time teaching all grain brewing.

Cheers.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: cujoach3
Jul 1st, 2015
1:38 pm
Well, I took the advice of Filbrewer and Baltoed and I continued to occasionally go into the Feed store and look at their barley. One time a few months ago I went in and the barley was really clean, and no sign of weevils or dust anywhere. So I bought 2 kilos and took it home and soaked it. I got about 90% germination so I immediately went back and bought as much as I could carry (13 kilos - I was riding my mountain bike and had to carry it in my backpack and that was all it would hold.)

I malted that 13 kg and got about 75-80% germination. I stopped it after 5 days because it was so hot I didn't want it to get moldy. I dried in the sun in my yard for 3 days, weighing it every day until it didn't lose weight that way. Then I put it in my electric oven. 55 degrees for 4 hours then 75 degrees for an hour.

I have made 3 batches of beer so far with it.

The first was a Kolsch using 90% of this grain and 10% 2 row from the US to boost the enzymes. A conservative option which doesn't waste too much hops if it comes out bad. It was OK but not great and was muddy looking after fermenting (maybe too much protein because I only malted it 4 days and didn't have a good way to separate the roots and plant portions). So I added gelatin which cleared it up nicely and this beer was very drinkable although nothing special. But I didn't expect that either.

Next was a stout. I used my homemade malt 80% with a little imported munich and 2 row and then imported crystal 80 and Roasted barley and chocolate malt. This came out very good but still needed the gelatin to clarify it.

Last I made a Sticke Altbier. I made it using a modified triple decoction - a nod to the fact that I had poorly modified grain and that was what the decoction was made for. This came out awesome. Just as good as most of the beers I have made with imported beers, and did not need the gelatin to clarify it. I used abut 85% of the homemade malt with 10% imported 2 row and the rest crystal and chocolate malt

So I will decoct any time i use my home made malt from now on. I just cannot seem to get great results with a single infusion mash using this malt. If I got 90 percent plus germination and was able to control it for a week or more without it molding It would be a different story.

Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Chichako
Jul 3rd, 2015
1:56 am
Hi HB_In_Subic, Where did you find the glass carboy that I see on your web site??

I guess it is time for a weekend trip to Subic. Got time for a beer??

Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: HB_In_Subic
Jul 3rd, 2015
6:04 am
Chichako,

I ordered it from the US and shipped via Balikbayan. It has since cracked on me. I only use plastic carboys now for Mango wine. I use the a couple of clear carboys I got from the US along with the blue water carboys for clearing stages. I keep them at most a month in the carboy. I do all of my primary fermenting in plastic 8 gallon buckets.

For one gallon batches, you can try to locate some Carlo Rossi jugs or there is a new beer supplier in Manila http://juanbrew.com/ that sells one gallon kits. They might be able to source a glass carboy. I used a Carlo Rossi jug to make my first mead which came out pretty good.

I would love to have a beer with you when I am home. Right now I am out of country for a while.
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Filbrewer
Jul 4th, 2015
3:47 pm
You can try Santiago Malt House from Juan Brew. It's an Australian 2-row malted in the Philippines by St. James (Santiago).

Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: rwalrath
Mar 22nd, 2016
2:29 am
Also bring in my supplies via balikbayon with no problems. Have an 18 gallon demijohn for secondary fermentation, an 8 gallon plastic and 7 gallon stainless steel for primary. Doing wines and my homebrew.

One thing I'm looking for (and have found some sources, but only through OLX so far, and haven't been succecssful in getting it shipped to my condo) is a 4 or 6 liter CO2 cylinder and regulator. There's a gas shop just outside the condo, but I don't want a huge cylinder-I'd never use it all . Anyone know a pet shop in Parañaque City who carries the smaller cylinders and regulators?

Thanks
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: Tonnex
Apr 14th, 2016
4:21 pm
I got a 20lb from olx. For the smaller ones, Contact mgmfoods.com.ph They sell the small co2 cylinder and other kegging equipments
Subject: Re: Homebrewing in the Tropics
Author: rwalrath
Apr 14th, 2016
8:27 pm
Thanks... I also found a 10# cyl on OLX... and got it filled near sister in law's place. Thanks! I will check out mgmfoods too-to check out their stock of things. Salamat po!

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